Recruit firefighters completed the weekend firefighter fundamentals class this weekend where they learned about breathing apparatus, basic hose handling, and basic ladder operations. Recruit classes will continue over the next two months covering a variety of firefighting subjects.

Great job to all the recruits and a special thanks to our instructors, officers and driver/operators. Captain Lee Jones, Lt. Hal Jones , FF/EMT Justin Thorpe, FF Jon Mendoza, D/O Brian Thompson.

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Pictured above from left to right: Back row Thomas Ramella, Tim McCord, DO Brain Thompson, Lt. Hal Jones, FF Jon Mendoza, Andy Gavin, Karl Koester, Lt. Eric Sanderson

Front lower row: Patrick Micheal, Steve Garvich, Kevin Cox, Alexander Volfe, FF Justin Thorpe.

Not in the picture: Ben Laughlin, Vladimir Stepanov, Seth Williams, Capt. Lee Jones.

ChelanFireRescueLogo200Chelan Fire and Rescue responded to a reported house fire at 926 Renn Terrance Drive in Chelan on 04/09/2016 around 0142 hours. Command 701, Engine 71, 73, Tender 71, Ladder71 responded on the first alarm, Command 5, Engine 52, Support 71 responded on the 2nd alarm. Engine 74, 72 moved up to the City of Chelan to provide coverage.

Engine 71 arrived to an exterior wall fire that had moved into the kitchen area of the residence with extension to the near-by brush and neighbors fence. Engine 71’s crew made an aggressive exterior attack knocking down the exterior fire and transitioning to the interior of the house knocking down the fire in the kitchen.

Fire was brought under control within 25 minute from the time it was reported. Chelan County Sheriff Deputies and Lake Chelan EMS units responded in support of the fire operations.

Fire is currently under investigation and appears to be a possible electrical/mechanical failure.

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sheriffsmAs the warm spring weather draws people to our local waters, The Chelan County Sheriff’s Office would like to remind everyone that our local waters can be dangerous this time of year. The water can be high, swift and cold as mountain snowpack melts, making hypothermia a real risk.

River users are encouraged to take safety precautions when recreating in rivers. Here are a few tips to stay safe:

  • Wear a PFD (personal flotation device).
  • Do not use alcohol or drugs when recreating on the river.
  • Watch children closely when they are on or near any type of water; stay close enough to reach them immediately.

When planning a boating or floating trip:

  • Always tell someone your route and when and where you plan to put in or take out.
  • Never float the river alone.
  • Bring a dry bag with food, water, and warm clothes.

Even the best water enthusiasts can misjudge changing water conditions when boating or swimming in open water. Be prepared at all times by wearing a life jacket – you never know when you’ll be tossed in the water.

sheriffsmOn March 31, 2016 the Chelan County Sheriff’s Office and the United States Forest Service (USFS) arrested Roger E. Grissom, a 56 year old male from Wenatchee for illegally dumping tires on USFS land. A second suspect has been identified and a warrant for his arrest has been requested through the Chelan County Prosecutors Office.

The incident occurred on Sunday, March 13, 2016, when 98 tires were discovered dumped along Potato Creek on the Entiat District of the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. Earlier that day a red Jeep Cherokee was observed driving up the Entiat River Rd. pulling a trailer loaded with tires.

The investigation relied heavily on help from the public after it was reported by local media and posted on social media. USFS Law Enforcement and Chelan County Deputies worked together to identify the suspects. The total dollar amount for the cleanup was $534 which included man hours and disposal.

USFS Officer Mike Kujala said, “It’s rare that we are able to identify suspects when garbage is dumped on public land. We would not have been able to make arrests in this case if it wasn’t for the public’s help.” Kujala reminds citizens that dumping trash is illegal on public lands and to call 9-1-1 if they see any suspicious activity.

wsdot logoState looks for information on viability of reinstating program

OLYMPIA – Washington produce growers could have another option for getting their goods to market, if there is sufficient demand to revitalize a rail-shipping program that was discontinued four years ago.

The Washington State Department of Transportation is seeking information from railroads and intermodal logistics companies to help determine if sufficient demand and expertise exists to revive a defunct state program that once supported a pool of refrigerated rail cars.

A request for information was released Wednesday, March 30, seeking proposals from parties interested in restoring the Washington Produce Rail Car program. The deadline for submissions is noon Monday, May 2.

Federal funding may be available to help support the program, and input from the freight community will help WSDOT determine if it will pursue such funding. “Both the number and quality of submissions is important to this process,” said WSDOT Freight Rail Policy & Program Manager Chris Herman. “We’ll be looking at the level of demand, as well as assessing the experience of each submitter in managing temperature-controlled fleets and meeting strict service requirements for perishable shipments.”

Designed to ensure a pool of temperature-controlled railcars was available to meet demand during peak growing and shipping season, the Produce Rail Car program originally launched in 2006 with federal and state funding. The program was suspended in 2012 when several privately-owned companies were expanding in the market. However, one of those competitors is no longer operating this service and WSDOT may be able to help fill the void if it proves to be economically viable.

The availability of temperature controlled rail or intermodal equipment is vital to transporting Washington-grown produce to markets beyond the state’s borders. According to Matt Harris of the Washington State Potato Commission, “Efficient movement of our perishable commodities is critical to the livelihood of potato growers in Washington state.”