sheriffsmOn March 31, 2016 the Chelan County Sheriff’s Office and the United States Forest Service (USFS) arrested Roger E. Grissom, a 56 year old male from Wenatchee for illegally dumping tires on USFS land. A second suspect has been identified and a warrant for his arrest has been requested through the Chelan County Prosecutors Office.

The incident occurred on Sunday, March 13, 2016, when 98 tires were discovered dumped along Potato Creek on the Entiat District of the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. Earlier that day a red Jeep Cherokee was observed driving up the Entiat River Rd. pulling a trailer loaded with tires.

The investigation relied heavily on help from the public after it was reported by local media and posted on social media. USFS Law Enforcement and Chelan County Deputies worked together to identify the suspects. The total dollar amount for the cleanup was $534 which included man hours and disposal.

USFS Officer Mike Kujala said, “It’s rare that we are able to identify suspects when garbage is dumped on public land. We would not have been able to make arrests in this case if it wasn’t for the public’s help.” Kujala reminds citizens that dumping trash is illegal on public lands and to call 9-1-1 if they see any suspicious activity.

wsdot logoState looks for information on viability of reinstating program

OLYMPIA – Washington produce growers could have another option for getting their goods to market, if there is sufficient demand to revitalize a rail-shipping program that was discontinued four years ago.

The Washington State Department of Transportation is seeking information from railroads and intermodal logistics companies to help determine if sufficient demand and expertise exists to revive a defunct state program that once supported a pool of refrigerated rail cars.

A request for information was released Wednesday, March 30, seeking proposals from parties interested in restoring the Washington Produce Rail Car program. The deadline for submissions is noon Monday, May 2.

Federal funding may be available to help support the program, and input from the freight community will help WSDOT determine if it will pursue such funding. “Both the number and quality of submissions is important to this process,” said WSDOT Freight Rail Policy & Program Manager Chris Herman. “We’ll be looking at the level of demand, as well as assessing the experience of each submitter in managing temperature-controlled fleets and meeting strict service requirements for perishable shipments.”

Designed to ensure a pool of temperature-controlled railcars was available to meet demand during peak growing and shipping season, the Produce Rail Car program originally launched in 2006 with federal and state funding. The program was suspended in 2012 when several privately-owned companies were expanding in the market. However, one of those competitors is no longer operating this service and WSDOT may be able to help fill the void if it proves to be economically viable.

The availability of temperature controlled rail or intermodal equipment is vital to transporting Washington-grown produce to markets beyond the state’s borders. According to Matt Harris of the Washington State Potato Commission, “Efficient movement of our perishable commodities is critical to the livelihood of potato growers in Washington state.”

wsdot logoDrivers should plan for periodic delays near construction zones

HYAK – It’s going to be a busy construction season on Interstate 90, as the Washington State Department of Transportation will start work in the next couple of weeks on a number of projects to improve sections of roadway from Snoqualmie Pass to Vantage.

A number of road-improvement projects will cause delays for drivers this spring and summer while WSDOT and contractor crews build, repair and paint bridges; add lanes; and replace deteriorating pavement.

“We have a lot of work east of Snoqualmie Pass this summer,” said Brian White, WSDOT South Central Region interim regional administrator. “Although we work closely with our contractors to minimize delays to drivers, I’d recommend adding some travel time if you’re trying to catch a flight or get to an appointment this summer.”


Next week, crews will start making repairs to the bridge over I-90 at the Stampede Pass interchange (exit 62). This work requires the overpass to be closed from April 4 to June 1. Drivers will experience nighttime, single-lane closures during the week and nighttime detours onto the on-and off-ramps Tuesday, April 5, through Thursday, April 7, while the contractor removes the existing bridge span.

In early April, crews will resume work to replace sections of the westbound lanes near Cle Elum. The westbound off-ramp to Oakes Avenue (exit 84) will be closed Monday through Friday throughout April. From mid-May until mid-June, it will be closed around the clock. During the off-ramp closure, drivers can access Cle Elum via the Peoh Road Bridge interchange at exit 85.

Work resumes in mid-April on the I-90 Snoqualmie Pass East project that builds a wider, safer and more reliable stretch of I-90 from Hyak to Keechelus Damand from Keechelus Dam to the Stampede Pass interchange. In May, crews will resume rock-blasting closures. Drivers need to plan for hour-long closures Mondays through Thursdays, starting an hour before sunset.

In early May, crews will resume painting the Vantage Bridge to preserve the bridge’s structural integrity. Crews started repainting the bridge last year and will finish this fall. Eastbound drivers will experience delays due to around-the-clock, single-lane closures.

In June, crews will repave the eastbound lanes between mileposts 67 and 70 near Easton Hill, and the westbound lanes between mileposts 62 and 64 near Price Creek. Crews will also repave the eastbound and westbound lanes between mileposts 106 and 122 near Ellensburg. Drivers will experience delays due to single-lane closures through these work zones.

 

WSDOT has a wide variety of resources to help drivers plan their trips across I-90. Drivers can find information on multiple websites, including the What’s Happening on I-90, Snoqualmie Pass and traffic alerts pages. Drivers can also follow WSDOT on Twitter using the handles @snoqualmiepass and @wsdot_east or sign up for email updates.

wsdot logoPlan ahead to allow time to meet the deadline; avoid fines

OLYMPIA – With spring’s arrival, the Washington State Department of Transportation is reminding motorists that studded tires must be removed by the last day in March.

Under state law, driving with studded tires after Thursday, March 31, is a traffic infraction that could result in a $124 ticket from law enforcement.

In addition, studs can wear down pavement, so removing them promptly helps extend the lifetime of state roadways. Tire removal services can get crowded as the deadline approaches, so please plan accordingly.

WSDOT will not be extending the studded tire deadline this year, but crews will continue to monitor roads, passes and forecasts and work to clear any late season snow or ice. Travelers are always reminded to “know before you go” by checking road conditions before heading out and staying on top of conditions with WSDOT’s social media and email alert tools.

Washington and Oregon share the same studded tire removal date. Other states may have later deadlines, but the Washington law applies to all drivers in the state, even visitors. No personal exemptions or waivers are issued.

More information about studded tire regulations in Washington is available online.

wash traffic commissionOLYMPIA – There’s good news for drivers who use the State Route 16 Tacoma Narrows Bridge. The Washington State Transportation Commission recently voted to suspend a planned 50-cent toll rate increase on the Tacoma Narrows Bridge, scheduled to take effect July 1, 2016.

The largest annual cost for the Tacoma Narrows Bridge is the debt service payment. The law requires debt service payments, along with other costs like maintenance, operations and insurance, be paid with toll revenues. The 30-year debt service schedule has payments going up every one or two years. Historically, traffic volumes have not increased at the pace necessary to meet these growing debt obligations. As a result, since July 2012, bridge users have experienced annual toll increases. 

But some toll relief has arrived this year. The Washington State Legislature provided $2.5 million in gas tax revenues to pay for the bridge’s debt service payments coming due between July 1, 2016, and June 30, 2017. This means the 50-cent toll increase planned for this July is no longer needed thanks to the state’s investment. Toll rates are now scheduled to remain at current levels through June 30, 2017.

WSTC’s Chairman Anne Haley was pleased with the Legislature’s decision to provide funding for the Tacoma Narrows Bridge debt service payments. “This investment made by the Legislature brings a much needed break to the annual toll rate increases on the bridge. The commission is committed to working with Legislative leaders, the TNB Citizen Advisory Committee, and the Washington State Department of Transportation to determine long-term options that may bring toll rate stability to the drivers of this bridge,” said Haley.

The commission will hold a final hearing to reflect in the administrative code the rate suspension decision. The hearing will start 1 p.m. May 17, at WSDOT’s headquarters building, 310 Maple Park Ave SE, in Olympia.

To learn more about the commission, visit: www.wstc.wa.gov/