waspSuspect a long time police officer for the city of Lynden

(Whatcom County)  – Detectives from the Washington State Patrol’s (WSP) Missing and Exploited Children’s Task Force (MECTF) arrested a former Lynden police officer today on child pornography charges. 

Donald Glunt, 57, of Lynden, was taken into custody without incident.  Glunt had very recently resigned his position with the Lynden Police Department.

The investigation originated after officials with Lynden PD discovered images on Glunt’s city owned cell phone while conducting an internal administrative investigation. On Wednesday, Lynden Police Chief Jack Foster asked WSP to conduct a criminal investigation into the matter.

The investigation was assigned to detectives from MECTF.  They reviewed digital evidence and interviewed the suspect, which led to his arrest today. The investigation revealed the suspect was trading images with a 16 year-old girl in Texas. Law enforcement authorities in Texas assisted detectives by interviewing the underage victim. Additional forensic review of various digital media devices seized as evidence is ongoing.

Glunt was booked into the Skagit County Jail on charges of Dealing and Possession of Depictions of Minors Engaged in Sexually Explicit Conduct and Viewing of Depictions of a Minor Engaged in Sexually Explicit Conduct.  Additional charges are possible pending the forensic analysis of the digital media devices.

Barnard250The Washington State Patrol’s Criminal Investigation Division has been assisting Minnesota’s Pine County Sheriff’s Office in attempts to locate a subject charged with 59 felony counts of Criminal Sexual Conduct involving two young females.

On April 11, the Pine County Attorney’s Office issued a criminal complaint against Barnard. The charges result from a multi-year investigation by the Pine County Sheriff’s Office into Barnard’s behavior while he was ministering to a religious group in Northern Pine County.

Later that same day, the Pine County Sheriff issued a nationwide warrant for Barnard, who was last known to be in the Spokane, Wash. area. The Pine County Sheriff’s Office is coordinating with the State of Washington and Homeland Security for the apprehension of Barnard.  

Anyone who may have information as to the whereabouts of Victor Barnard, please call WSP Detective Ryan Spangler at (509) 227-6644 or the Pine County SO tip line at (320) 629-8342.

pudStaff proposes revised measurements now that initial targets have been met

WENATCHEE – Now that Chelan County PUD has achieved the financial targets set during strategic planning in 2010, commissioners are looking ahead to future measurements to make sure District finances remain sound through 2019 and beyond.   

Chief Financial/Risk Officer Kelly Boyd, Treasurer Debbie Litchfield and Mark O’Bryan,  strategic financial planning director,  talked with PUD commissioners Tuesday about revised targets for the key financial measurements of liquidity, rate of return, debt ratio and debt coverage.

Reducing long-term debt remains a high priority, both for PUD customer-owners and because it improves three of the four financial measurements, Litchfield said, while maintaining strong reserves.

“Debt reduction benefits current customers by helping to maintain low electric rates,” she said, adding that the value of a $1 million drop in interest costs is roughly equal to a 2-percent rate impact.

The District accelerated debt reduction in 2013 by paying off $27 million more than the $41 million that was budgeted.  Plans are to reduce long-term debt by about $80 million this year.

Litchfield said the District’s strong reserves (measured as “liquidity”) offer the continued opportunity to pay down debt ahead of forecasts in the next five years and beyond.  Benefits of this approach include helping to maintain low electric rates, while offering flexibility in paying for ongoing operation costs, she said.

O’Bryan said discussions on the proposed changes to the financial policies are scheduled to continue at the April 21 board meeting. Plans are to ask commissioners to set revised measurements at the May 19 meeting.  

In other business Tuesday commissioners:

  • Received an update from General Manager Steve Wright on the Salmon Passage Forum hosted with Grant County PUD on Monday. Representatives from 15 state, federal and Canadian agencies and tribes came to see the work being done to make sure there is safe passage for the record number of adults expected to migrate up the Columbia River this spring despite the impacts on river levels from the spillway fracture at Wanapum Dam.  Attendees toured Grant PUD’s Priest Rapids and Wanapum dams and heard their plans to trap spring Chinook at Priest Rapids and truck them upriver while modifications are made to the fish ladders at Wanapum Dam. They also toured Chelan PUD’s Rock Island Dam to see the work being done to extend three fish ladder entrances to make them accessible during varying water levels and flows. A roundtable discussion to share information and concerns followed the tours. Wright said the forum was valuable in “building relationships with people we will be working with extensively over the next few months.” There is a need for great communication, he added, which will be aided by the relationships forged Monday. “In that regard, the day was really a great success,” Wright said.
  •  Heard from Commissioner Norm Gutzwiler that he will not seek re-election for a third, six-year term on the PUD board.  Gutzwiler joined the board in 2003 and was re-elected to represent District 1 in 2008. He will complete his current term by serving through the end of the year. (Commissioner Gutzwiler’s picture is available in the PUD’s online photo gallery.)

wasp(Olympia)— On any given day, in any given situation, any Washington State trooper may be confronted with an aggressive subject. Verbal de-escalation is always the goal, but is not always successful. This is why troopers are given a number of other tools to defend themselves should the need arise. One of those tools is the Taser.   

In the latest edition of our “Good to Know” series, Sergeant Shannon Bendiksen and Corporal Paul Cagle briefly describe the Taser’s function and show you some of the training trooper cadets have to endure.   

“The short time that they’re incapacitated is just what’s needed to apply the ‘cuffs, and at that point most suspects stop fighting,” Bendiksen said.

The Washington State Patrol video can be viewed here.

Trooper cadets are exposed to the effects of the Taser for three main reasons. It builds confidence in their equipment, allows them to realize the strengths and limitations of the device, and gives them practice handcuffing a subject after the Taser was fired. 

Any display or actual use of the Taser by a WSP trooper must be reported to their supervisor for review.  

waspTroopers conducted seatbelt emphases throughout District 6 during the month of March. As a result of the emphases, 220 citations were issued to those who were not wearing a seatbelt, or failed to wear a seatbelt properly. During the month of March, there were no fatalities involving unrestrained motorists in District 6, which is a trend the State Patrol hopes continues. Troopers will continue to be watching for motorists that fail to properly wear a seatbelt in an effort to prevent any further tragedies.

To be considered properly worn, the belt must be fastened and adjusted across the body as designed. Wearing a seatbelt fastened, but moved under the arm or behind the back, is considered improperly worn, and in addition to being unsafe, is subject to a $124 citation. It is the driver’s responsibility to ensure all children are properly restrained in a car seat, booster seat or seatbelt appropriate to the child. Drivers are also asked to remind all passengers in their vehicle to buckle up, before moving the vehicle.

A properly worn vehicle restraint gives motorists the best chance to survive a collision. Please Buckle Up!