bball 2 10 20

The Manson Trojans have qualified for post season play.

They will face the Oroville Hornets Wednesday, February 12 at 6:00 p.m. at Manson High School.

Come support your Trojans!!!

No passes accepted. $7 adults/ $5 for students with ASB card. No free admittance

manson parks logo

Regular Board Meeting
142 Pedoi Street, Bumgarner Building, February 13, 2020, 4:10pm

I. Call to Order
II. Flag Salute
III. Agenda Additions and Deletions
IV. Public Comment
V. Approval of Minutes
a. January 9, 2020 regular meeting minutes
b. January 23, 2020 special meeting minutes
VI. Financial Review
a. Review Monthly Financial Report
b. Review and Approve Monthly Voucher
VII. Old Business
a. Commercial vendors
i. Sharkey and Shoreline contracts
ii. The Galley
1. Commercial Vendor application
2. Moorage at Manson Bay Marina
b. Manson Bay Marina policy update: ‘out day’ options
c. 2020 Goals and Objectives
d. Comprehensive Plan update for 2020
e. Director’s Report
VIII. New Business
a. Leffler Field
i. Pirate Carnival
b. Equipment: diesel tractor mower
c. Pacific Engineering contract amendment
d. Marina
i. WiFi
ii. Dock cleats
IX. Adjournment
Next regular meeting: March 12, 2020 at 4:10pm, 142 Pedoi Street, Manson, WA 98831

blueandwhiteawards2020

The Manson School Board is asking our community for nominations of Manson School District Staff Members who have made a significant contribution to the lives of students and/or the greater Manson community. The Manson School Board hopes to receive nominations from parents, students, former students, and community members who have been involved in our schools.

Selection criteria is as follows: one certificated employee (grades P-12) and one support staff employee (secretaries, bus drivers, custodians, para-professionals, food services, coaches, etc.) 

Nominations will be accepted until March 25, 2020 at noon. Winning nominees will be announced at the Manson School Board meeting on March 30, 2020 at 6:00 p.m.

Nominations forms are available online at the school district website www.manson.org, in both English and Spanish.

If you should have any questions, please call the Manson School District office at 687-3140.

ChelanFireRescueLogo200Chelan Fire & Rescue

Monday, February 10, 2020 / 9-13:00

Long Range Planning Meeting Agenda

 

Review of Mission Statement

Review of Multi-year budget forecasting

2020 Organizational Goals:

  1. Training:

    1. Continue to improve quality and delivery of training program to meet standards and requirements for operational readiness.

    2. Regional approach to coordinating delivery of training

    3. Regional training facility

    4. Special programs:

      1. Rescue Swimmer

      2. Rope Rescue (Low Angle)

      3. Marine Operations

  1. Community Relations :

    1. Review of current programs and effectiveness

    2. Future outreach and education

  1. Staffing:

    1. Review of current staffing

    2. Staffing options for 2020 and beyond

    3. Volunteer/Reserve Recruitment and Retention

  1. Apparatus Replacement:

    1. Review of current fleet

    2. Recommendations for surplus/replacement

    3. Long range apparatus replacement plan

  1. Facilities

    1. Review of current facilities

    2. Long range capital improvement plan

    3. Regional approach to facilities sharing

  1. Measurable Goals:

    1. Turnout Time – 2 minutes

    2. Effective Work Force for Critical Tasks (SOG 010)

    3. Fire Loss ($) versus Pre-fire Valuation

    4. Fiscal Responsibility to Manage Budget

    5. Maintain clean annual audits

winterfest2020 2

Friday, January 24

All day: Find Tsilly

3pm-5pm: Live Ice Carving

5pm-8pm: Apple Bin Train Rides

5pm-10pm: Local Brewers + Distillers Night (21+)

7:30pm: Jim Basnight on the Deschutes Brewery Main Stage

Saturday, January 25

All day: Find Tsilly

10am: Wally Peterson Memorial Snowmobile Drag Races

12pm-4pm: Ice Tower Carving + Wish Papers

12pm-4pm: Mystery Mitten Walk

12:30pm: Family Magic Show

1pm-2pm: 2nd Annual Viki Downey Polar Bear Swim & Bonfire

2pm: Family Magic Show

3pm-6pm: Apple Bin Train Rides

3pm-10pm: Alefest (21+)

4pm: Glenn Snyder on the Deschutes Brewery Main Stage

6:30pm: Lighting of the Ice Tower

7pm: Kevin Jones Band on the Deschutes Brewery Main Stage

7:45pm: Gary Knowlton Memorial Water Lantern

Sunday, January 26

All day: Find Tsilly

10am-12pm: Battle of the Bloody Mary (21+)

You can purchase tickets online until midnight tonight here. See you this weekend!

manson parks logo

Special Board Meeting

142 Pedoi Street, Bumgarner Building, January 23, 2020, 4:00pm

I. Call to Order

II. Flag Salute

III. Leffler Field financing

IV. Adjournment

The American Legion was founded in 1919 on four pillars: Veterans Affairs and Rehabilitation, National Security, Americanism, and Children and Youth. Each of these pillars encompasses a variety of programs that benefit our nation’s veterans, its service members, their families, the youth of America and ordinary citizens.

On January 13 the Manson American Legion, Post 108 made special presentations of two 4x6 foot American flags, one for Manson High and the second Manson Elementary, addressing two of the four pillars. Post 108 was recognized in 2019 by the Manson Chamber of Commerce with a Community Recognition Award for their assistance in the Lake Chelan Valley, helping youth and programs in our community.

Commander Clyde McCullough represented Post 108 at Manson Elementary School. Receiving the flag were Elementary Principal Ben Riippi with a group of elementary students.

Vice Commander Brian Strausbaugh and Post Service Officer Norm Manly took the lead at the High School. Manson High Senior Class President Parker Schoenwald, Manson Schools Superintendent, Matt Charlton and Principal Dr. Heather Ireland received the flag, representing all students, staff and teachers.

Chili Feed 2020

volume 1 cover

The Washington State Legislature will ultimately decide if a road usage charge will be implemented in Washington

OLYMPIA – People who are interested in how a Road Usage Charge might work in Washington can now download the full report from the Washington Road Usage Charge Pilot Project website. On Jan. 13, the Washington State Transportation Commission transmitted their final report to the governor, state Legislature and Federal Highway Administration on how Washington can begin a transition away from the state gas tax and toward a road usage charge system.

In collaboration with the Washington Road Usage Charge Steering Committee, the WSTC’S report includes analysis and findings of the legal, fiscal, operational, and policy impacts of a road usage charge and provides recommendations and options on how RUC could be implemented in Washington.

The state legislature will ultimately decide if a road usage charge will be implemented in Washington. Should the Legislature move forward with a road usage charge, it must consider several key topics, all of which the commission’s final report addressed. Those include how to: gradually transition to a RUC system, determine what vehicles should be subject to paying a RUC, determine the per-mile rate policy, set forth the allowable use of RUC revenue, and determine details around how a RUC program would be implemented.

“We thank the steering committee and volunteer pilot project participants for contributing to years of research and analysis on this innovative transportation funding policy,” said Jerry Litt, chair of the Washington State Transportation Commission. “We believe road usage charging is a promising and viable option for Washington, and we look forward to having the Legislature consider a gradual but necessary transition away from relying on the consumption of fossil fuel to fund our roads.”

The 29-member Road Usage Charge Steering Committee has guided Washington’s assessment of road usage charging since 2012. The committee supported and advised on the development of the RUC pilot project and submitted its final report on its road usage charging findings to the commission in October 2019. Based upon the findings of the steering committee, the commission determined its final set of recommendations and their final report, which details the results of the 7-year-long assessment of road usage charging. It includes the 12-month-long test drive portion of the pilot project that involved more than 2,000 statewide drivers who logged 15 million miles from February 2018 to January 2019.

As vehicles become more fuel-efficient or switch to electric power, gas tax revenue is expected to decline by as much as 45 percent by 2035. In 2012, the Legislature directed the commission to assess the potential of a road usage charge to replace the gas tax. A road usage charge is a per-mile charge drivers would pay for the use of the roads, as opposed to paying by the gallon of gas.

CC sheriff logo 2018Sheriff Brian Burnett reports on January 11th, 2020 at approximately 2:05 am, a female called RiverCom dispatch from the 400 block of Pioneer Avenue in Cashmere, WA. The caller, a 70 year old Cashmere woman later identified as Anita Jones said she had just killed her mother.

Deputies responded to the scene and detained Jones without incident. She was transported to the Chelan County Sheriff’s office where she was interviewed by detectives. Jones has been booked into the Chelan County Regional Justice Center for Murder 1st Degree.

Jones is believed to have acted alone and there is no threat to the public.

Detectives are currently on scene in Cashmere continuing the investigation.

manson schoolIn search of a Head Coach to build the program

Manson High School is launching a coed high school tennis team in the spring of 2020.  In the fall of 2019 the district met with parents, students and community members to determine the viability of a tennis program and found strong interest from all parties. “At least 20 students have indicated strong interest in the program” said Athletic Director Eric Sivertson.   The district is very excited to partner with Harmony Meadows as our home court. 

The next step in launching the program is hiring a Head Coach.  In discussing the program in the community we have identified a number of individuals willing to help with the program or even be assistant coaches, but at this time we have not found our Head Coach. We are looking for an energetic leader that can help us recruit student athletes into the program and can also teach the fundamentals of tennis.  If interested, please complete an application packet at www.manson.org

If you have questions about the position contact Eric Sivertson at 509-687-3140 or email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

GRAGEDA ADELINA

Manson High School Post-Secondary Coordinator Addie Grageda could not be more proud of the Internship Program she leads.

Ms. Grageda recently learned her efforts to renew and expand a grant from a private non-profit foundation, The Discuren Foundation, has been awarded.

Manson School District will receive $177,000 in funds over the next three years to provide valuable opportunities to high school students. The funding will also expand the program and allow middle school students to participate in training and career activities.

Addie shared “one of my favorite things is hearing the senior students speak of their internships experiences at their senior presentations and tell their families, friends and teachers how it has helped them discover a career path they would like to pursue, as well as given them an opportunity to meet someone in our community that has motivated them to follow their dreams.”

These programs would not be possible without the support of individuals, businesses and agencies in our Valley. The partnership in providing authentic career experiences to students and future employees to businesses is truly a “win-win.”

JAVESJaves Escalera, Director of Marketing at Coldwell Banker LCP shared “As an alum from Manson High School (class of 2014), I can first-hand say that it would have improved my awareness of the career path that I wanted to take if I had the opportunity to have had an internship. It’s easy to get the education you need, but it’s equally important to understand what you’re working towards. And that’s what internships are, the application of everything you’ve learned in a hands-on setting.”

sheriff wreck

Sheriff Brian Burnett reports on January 6, 2020 shortly after 7:00 a.m., a Chelan County Sheriff’s Deputy was involved in an injury collision in the 17000 block of Highway US 97A just North of Entiat.

A vehicle traveling southbound lost control and crossed over the center line colliding with the northbound Sheriff’s Office vehicle. The driver and two passengers from the southbound vehicle were transported to Central Washington Hospital with potentially serious injuries.

The involved Deputy was transported by a Supervisor to Central Washington Hospital and released with minor injuries.

The Washington State Patrol is handling the collision investigation and it appears that weather and road conditions may have been a contributing factor.

The Chelan County Sheriff’s Office encourages motorists traveling in winter weather to exercise all precautions while traveling in winter weather conditions.

ChelanFireRescueLogo200AGENDA
Chelan Fire and Rescue
Wednesday, January 15, 2020 at 4:00 P.M.
232 East Wapato, Chelan, WA
Proposed Chelan Fire and Rescue agenda pending Board approval.
Flag Salute:
Regular Meeting Call to Order:
Approve Agenda:
Public Comment:
Consent Agenda:
• Revenue and Expenditure Report: November 2019 Revenue & Expenditure Report
• Payroll: $119,375.96 December 1-31, 2019 Paid: 01-03-2020
• Vouchers for December 1-31, 2019 General Account: Vouchers #746134 – 746141 for $1,602.56; Vouchers #746142 – 746155 for $11,698.66; Vouchers #746156 – 746166 for $4,677.58; Vouchers #746180 – 746186 for $4,316.44.
• Vouchers for December 1-31, 2019 Capital Account: Vouchers #746133 for $48,422.73.
• Minutes: December 11, 2019
Fire Chief Report:
• 2019 Budget / Emergency Response Report-Yr End /Operations/ Community Risk Reduction
Assistant Chief Report:
• Volunteer Recruitment & Retention / Training
Firefighters Association Report:
Unfinished Business:
• Long Range Plan – Set meeting date/time
New Business:
Special Events:
• January 17-26 Winterfest
• January 28th – WFC and WFCA Legislative Day (Olympia)
Board for Volunteer Firefighters:
Public Comment:
Commissioner Comments:
Executive Session:
Adjournment:

manson parks logo

Regular Board Meeting
142 Pedoi Street, Bumgarner Building, January 9, 2020, 4:10pm
I. Call to Order
II. Flag Salute
III. Election of officers
IV. Conflict of Interest documents
V. Payroll and Voucher Authorization Form
VI. Board member orientation
VII. Agenda Additions and Deletions
VIII. Public Comment
IX. Approval of Minutes
a. December 12, 2019 Regular meeting minutes
b. December 12, 2019 Joint Board Meeting minutes
c. December 23, 2019 Special Meeting minutes
X. Financial Review
a. Review Monthly Financial Report
b. Review and Approve Monthly Voucher
XI. Old Business
a. Commercial vendors
i. Sharkey and Shoreline contracts
ii. The Galley
1. Commercial Vendor application
2. Moorage at Manson Bay Marina
b. Old Mill policy update: detached trailers
c. Manson Bay Marina policy update: ‘out day’ options
d. 2020 Goals and Objectives
e. Director’s Report
XII. New Business
a. Leffler Field acquisition
i. Interlocal Agreement
ii. Vote on joint purchase of property with Manson School District
XIII. Adjournment
Next regular meeting: February 13, 2020 at 4:10pm, 142 Pedoi Street, Manson, WA 98831

dougcountysherlogoOn January 4, 2020 at approximately 9:29 PM a Douglas County Deputy attempted to make a traffic stop on a passenger car near BJ’s in Rock Island. The vehicle failed to yield and fled.

The pursuing Deputy discontinued the pursuit due to the immediate safety concerns. Shortly after, a second Deputy who was in the area observed the same vehicle driving at a high rate of speed. The Deputy observed the vehicle fail to stop at Rock Island Drive and State Route 28 and continued eastbound on SR28. The Deputy pursued the vehicle.

The suspect vehicle lost control at approximately milepost 12 on SR28 while it was passing another vehicle on the roadway. The suspect vehicle spun and struck the guardrail. The vehicle regained control and continued.

At approximately milepost 15, the vehicle lost control again and struck an occupied parked car on the shoulder of the roadway. The Deputies secured the occupants of the suspect vehicle. None of the involved persons sustained major injuries.

The driver of the suspect vehicle was identified as Jessica H. Fisk a 22-year-old female out of Cashmere. Jessica Fisk was booked into CCRJ for attempting to elude a police vehicle, hit and run collision, reckless endangerment, suspended driver’s license and two outstanding arrest warrants.

wsdot logoSecond Commercial Aviation Coordinating Commission meeting Jan. 9

OLYMPIA – 2020 kicks off with more work researching and discussing the location of Washington’s next commercial airport as the Commercial Aviation Coordinating Commission (CACC) meets Jan. 9, at Sea-Tac Airport.

The commission will narrow down possible airport sites based on previous research as well as factors including airspace, local land use, environmental impacts, market demand and community input.

The group will present the ongoing Puget Sound Regional Council Aviation Baseline Study and discuss a sustainable vision for Washington’s aviation system, including ways to accommodate capacity at existing airports.

The meeting is open to the public, but does not include a public comment period.

The CACC’s 15 voting and 11 nonvoting members include representatives from the aviation and freight industries, private citizens, state and local agencies and elected officials. The Washington State Department of Transportation provides the commission technical assistance and staff support from its Aviation Division.

The commission’s first meeting was Oct. 30, 2019, at the state Capitol Campus in Olympia and included discussion of the administrative process, goals of the group and previous aviation studies.

The Legislature created the CACC to determine how Washington can meet future commercial aviation demands. Final recommendations are due to the Legislature in January 2022.

To keep up with documents and information, visit the CACC website.

Commercial Aviation Coordinating Commission meeting:

When:            10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 9

Where:           Sea-Tac Airport, Central Auditorium

Details:           The meeting is open to the public but no public comment period is scheduled.

 Final poster Burke Singleto

Singleton Park, located at the corner of Madeline and Hyacinth in Manson, is a hub for sports and play in the Lake Chelan Valley. Its ball fields are frequented throughout the year by athletes playing baseball and soccer, and children playing at the playground. While the fields have seen some upgrades, the playground is over 30 years old and safety concerns have become the driving force for some much-needed changes. After receiving a near-failing safety inspection just over a year ago, the Park District began brainstorming. The options quickly became clear- remove the playground entirely or replace it.

Play is crucial to a child’s development; it helps with balance, strength, hand-eye coordination, problem-solving, social skills, learning and cognitive skills, as well as emotional and mental well-being. Simply put, play is the building block of strong people and a strong community. That being said, removing Singleton’s playground was not an option.

As the research began and progressed, the project transformed from a basic need to replace the play equipment. Quickly it grew into a desire to provide our community’s families not only with a place to play, but a place where people of all abilities can play side-by-side… an inclusive playground… a place of wonder! That’s when the community spirit really took over.

After receiving conceptual designs from various playground equipment manufacturers, a committee was formed to help with equipment selection. Committee members include Alicia Alexander, Rob Campbell, Johnny Morfin, Brian Patterson, Robin Pittman, Taylor Quigley, Ben Riippi, Bill Sharkey, Adelina Velasco, and Maria Zaragoza. Their goal was to review the proposed playground designs, make changes based on community need, and make a final recommendation to the Manson Parks Board of Commissioners.

On Thursday, December 12th, 2019, at the Manson Parks regular monthly Board meeting, Commissioners unanimously approved purchase of the proposed Burke playground equipment. The playground will feature a large structure designed for kids ages 5 to 12, a separate large structure for kids ages 2 to 5, a “Rev8” spinner, “Orb Rocker”, swing set, and several other items. The total for the equipment came to $133, 326.20.

Funding for the equipment was made possible by the following sponsors.

Thank you to:

• Tom & Meg Names Family Foundation
• Burke Move With Us Grant
• Lake Chelan Rotary
• Community Foundation of North Central Washington
• Lake Chelan Community Services Council
• Chelan-Douglas Developmental Disabilities Program
• Walmart
• Wenatchee Valley Medical Group
• Lake Chelan Boating Club
• Green Dot Sub Shop
• Lake Chelan Boating Club

The next step in the process includes selection of the ground surfacing material, which is a vital piece of the equation. It will likely be a combination of Engineered wood fiber (wood chips), and a soft composite rubber material called pour-in-place. Both meet the requirements for wheelchair accessibility and fall cushioning, as well as providing a tactile element to satisfy sensory needs. A concrete border and benches will be installed around the playground. Engineered wood fiber is expected to cost as much as $25,000, and the areas of pour-in-place could come in at $60,000. Supervised installation, where the manufacturer provides a trained specialist to lead community volunteers during the course of installation, is expect to be $12,000. Cost of the concrete border, benches, and ground work are yet to be determined.

Community support for this project has been incredible, but there are still opportunities to help!

Through December 31st, 2019, visit www.givencw.org to donate through CFNCW’s Give NCW campaign. After that, checks can be mailed to Manson Parks, PO Box 590, Manson WA 98831. Cash and credit card donations can also be accepted at our office on 142 Pedoi Street in Manson.

Volunteers will be needed for installation of the new equipment, ground work, and tear-down of the existing equipment. If you’d like to be a part of the fun, contact our office by calling 509-687-9635, or emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Installation of the equipment will begin in the spring, weather permitting.

WSDTlogo450Commission recommends a gradual approach to adoption; recommendations now move on to the legislature

OLYMPIA – The Washington State Transportation Commission adopted recommendations today, Tuesday, Dec. 17, on how Washington can begin a transition away from the state gas tax and toward a road usage charge system.

The commission based its recommendations on extensive research, statewide public engagement, as well detailed analysis of the participant feedback and system performance of the 12-month Washington Road Usage Charge Pilot Project. These recommendations, along with the Road Usage Charge Steering Committee’s final report, will be transmitted to the Washington State Legislature, Governor Jay Inslee and the Federal Highway Administration in January 2020.

At the core of these recommendations, the Legislature is encouraged to begin a slow and gradual transition away from the gas tax, starting with requiring vehicles in the state-owned fleet to pay a road usage charge in lieu of the gas tax. The commission also recommends applying a road usage charge to electric vehicle owners who pay no gas tax and hybrid vehicle owners who pay little gas tax. The recommendations include taking the time during this gradual transition period to conduct additional research, such as collaborating with other states on cross-border travel, reducing administrative and operational costs, and assessing compliance gaps and potential enforcement measures. The commission did not offer a timeline for a full transition of all vehicles in the state to a road usage charge, recommending that should not occur for at least 10 years and likely several decades as many cars continue to pay the gas tax.

“This is an important first step in ensuring future funding security for Washington’s aging roads and bridges,” said Jerry Litt, chair of the Washington State Transportation Commission. “Revenues from our state gas tax will begin to decline as vehicle fuel efficiency continues to increase. We are already struggling to ensure adequate funding to maintain our system of roads and bridges today. Thanks to the pilot project and years of research, we believe road usage charging is a promising and viable option for the Legislature to consider, and now is the time to begin a gradual but necessary transition away from relying on the consumption of fossil fuel to fund our roads.”

A 29-member Road Usage Charge Steering Committee has guided Washington’s assessment of road usage charging since 2012. The committee supported and advised development of the pilot test drive and prepared its final report on road usage charging in Washington earlier this year. Based upon the findings of the steering committee, the commission determined its final set of recommendations and their final report to be issued in January 2020 will detail the results of the seven-year-long assessment of road usage charging. It includes the 12-month-long test drive portion of the pilot project that included over 2,000 statewide drivers driving 15 million miles from February 2018 to January 2019.

“We appreciate the time and effort our pilot project participants dedicated, through reporting their miles driven, completing surveys, participating in focus groups, and sharing thoughtful questions and comments with us.” said Joe Tortorelli, chair of the Road Usage Charge Steering Committee and member of the Washington State Transportation Commission. “Feedback from participants and members of the general public helped inform the final report and recommendations. We look forward to sharing this report with the legislature early next year.”

As vehicles become more fuel-efficient or switch to electric power, gas tax revenue is expected to decline by as much as 45 percent by 2035. In 2012, the Legislature directed the commission to assess the potential of a road usage charge to replace the gas tax. A road usage charge is a per-mile charge drivers would pay for the use of the roads, as opposed to paying by the gallon of gas.

WSDTlogo450OLYMPIA – The Washington State Transportation Commission will take action next week on policy recommendations to the Washington State Legislature on whether and when the state should consider implementing a Road Usage Charge (RUC) system as a possible replacement to the gas tax.

The commission meeting starts at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 17, and at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at the Transportation Building, 310 Maple Park Ave. SE, on the Capitol Campus in Olympia. The meeting is open to the public and persons wishing to speak to the commission may do so during public comment periods each day, including a public comment opportunity prior to commission action on its road usage charging recommendations.

The commission will take final action at 1 p.m. Tuesday on its findings and recommendations related to whether and when a RUC system could replace the gas tax to fund roads and bridges. A RUC is a per-mile charge drivers would pay for the use of roads, as opposed to paying by the gallon of gas. Because gasoline is taxed by the gallon, as vehicles become more fuel-efficient or switch to electric power, gas tax revenue is expected to decline by as much as 45 percent by 2035. In 2012, the Legislature directed the commission to assess the potential of a RUC to replace the gas tax.

The final RUC report will detail the results of a 7-year-long assessment of road usage charging and a pilot project that involved more than 2,000 drivers statewide in a live test of RUC. The commission will consider the work of the RUC steering committee, results and findings from the test-driving phase of the pilot project, input from the pilot participants, and input from the public, as they finalize recommendations and next steps. The commission will submit the report to the governor, Legislature and the Federal Highway Administration in January 2020.

Also on Tuesday, the commission will receive an update on current traffic and revenue data for all tolled facilities, including the State Route 99 tunnel. Commission staff will present an overview of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge loan report, which the commission will submit to the Legislature in January, indicating the amount of loan needed to avoid a toll rate increase next year. The commission also will discuss the work plan and schedule for a legislatively directed study it will conduct to assess the possibility of discounted tolls and other programs to assist low-income drivers.

Commissioners also will hear the findings and recommendations from the lead consultant who conducted an analysis of congestion pricing in downtown Seattle. Congestion pricing is a charge drivers pay when they enter the most congested areas at the busiest times. Commissioned by the transportation network company Uber, the study considered whether charging all drivers could be an alternative to direct taxes or licensing limitations imposed on transportation network companies.

Tuesday afternoon the commission will continue its ongoing examination of the policy issues related to vehicle automation. John Niles, co-author of a book on autonomous vehicles, will discuss the potential effects on communities and public safety of shifting 50 percent or more of today’s privately owned and human-operated vehicles to automated vehicles.

On Wednesday, the commission will take action to adopt its annual report to the Legislature, which includes a number of recommendations on transportation policy and funding. Commissioners also will hear briefings on policy topics including, development of Vision 2050, the Puget Sound Regional Council’s newest long-range plan; an update to the Washington State Department of Transportation’s state plan for passenger and freight rail; and, a study underway by WSDOT’s aviation division to evaluate the potential for using electric aircraft in passenger air service.

For more information about the commission and a complete meeting agenda, visit: www.wstc.wa.gov/

check singing 2

Manson School District was the lucky recipient of the “Change for Charities” program sponsored through 12 Tribes Colville Casinos.

ASB President Parker Schoenwald, Superintendent Matt Charlton and Middle/High School Principal Heather Ireland were presented with a check from Tony Posey, General Manager of Mill Bay Casino in the amount of $2,658.71.

This donation will be used with the intention to help students to participate in extra-curricular, clubs, field trips/camps etc. where fees or equipment might prevent them from doing so. These funds will be available for student’s kindergarten through 12th grade.

Thank you Mill Bay Casino!

leffler field 800

Google Street View Photo

The Manson Community’s long running effort to secure a parcel of land, commonly known as Leffler Field, for public use is a step closer to occurring. The five acre (4.97) parcel is located in the center of downtown Manson.

On November 26, a vacant land purchase and sale agreement was completed between the Estate of Edna R. Leffler and two buyers, the Manson Park and Recreation District and the Manson School District. The purchase price is $1.3 million. The agreement includes grant funding awarded to Manson Park and Recreation from both Chelan County and The State of Washington. Chelan County has designated $500,000 in funding from their Rural Counties Economic Fund. The Washington State Legislature has appropriated $250,000 towards the acquisition from its 2019-20 Capital Budget. The remaining $550,000 will be financed by Manson School District.

December Opportunities for the Manson community to give input to both Boards on the purchase.

·        December 12 at 5:00PM at the Manson Parks Building: a joint meeting of the Manson Park and Recreation Board and the Manson School Board will be held with an opportunity for public comment.

·        December 19th at 5:00PM in the Manson Elementary Library: the Manson School Board will offer a second opportunity for public comment at their regular December board meeting.

·        Written comments may be shared by:

o   Mail

§  Must include a full name and phone number to verify authenticity ·        Manson Park and Recreation District – PO Box 590, Manson, WA 98831

·        Manson School District – PO Box A, Manson, WA 98831

o   Email

§  Must include a full name and phone number to verify authenticity  

·        Manson Parks and Recreation District  – This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Manson School District – This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

dot snow chutes

reopen the highway to bicycles, vehicles next spring

DIABLO – A snowy forecast means State Route 20 North Cascades Highway will close for the season at 6 a.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 11. This is the latest road closure date in more than a decade.

Washington State Department of Transportation crews close this stretch of SR 20 every year once snow fills the avalanche chutes that line the highway, which poses a safety risk to travelers and road crews.

Road closure points

The closure points are at milepost 134/Ross Dam Trailhead and at milepost 177/Silver Star Gate. When significant snow begins to fall, WSDOT crews will move the western closure point back to milepost 130/Colonial Creek Campground and the eastern closure point to milepost 168/Early Winters Campground. These weather-dependent changes usually happen in January. Signs along SR 20 are posted in advance of the closure point and updates on the WSDOT website will reflect where the road is closed.

Winter recreation on SR 20

Hikers, skiers, snowmobilers and other recreationalists can access the closed portion of highway during the winter season. Users should park in designated parking areas to allow plow drivers the space they need to clear snow around the closed stretch’s access gates.

WSDOT closes this stretch of highway due to avalanche risk, so anyone using this area should check forecasts and be aware of quickly changing conditions in the mountains. Travelers can also check conditions with North Cascades National Park before trips to this area.

Spring reopening

In late winter/spring 2020, WSDOT avalanche and maintenance crews, including Mazama the Avalanche Rescue Goat, will assess conditions and begin clearing work to reopen this cross-state route through the Cascade Mountains.

manson parks logo

Regular Board Meeting
142 Pedoi Street, Bumgarner Building, December 12, 2019, 4:10pm
I. Call to order
II. Flag salute
III. Agenda additions and deletions
IV. Approval of Minutes
a. November 14, 2019 regular meeting minutes
b. December 3, 2019 special meeting minutes
V. Financial Review
a. Review monthly financial report
b. Review and approve monthly voucher
VI. Old Business
a. Singleton Park playground renovation
i. Authorize purchase of playground equipment
b. 2020 Budget
i. Wages and benefits
c. Concession permit request
d. Director’s Report
VII. New Business
a. Winter marine sewage pump-out
b. Marina policy update: “out day” options
c. Old Mill policy update: detached trailers
VIII. 5:00pm: Joint Board meeting with Manson School District Board
a. Leffler Field acquisition
i. Public Comment
IX. Adjournment
Next Regular Meeting: January 9, 2019 at 4:10pm, 142 Pedoi Street, Manson, WA 98831

ChelanFireRescueLogo200Proposed Chelan Fire and Rescue agenda pending Board approval.

Flag Salute:

Regular Meeting Call to Order:

Oath of Office: Karyl Oules

Approve Agenda:

Public Comment:

Consent Agenda:

  • Revenue and Expenditure Report: October 2019 Revenue & Expenditure Report

  • Payroll: $117,931.44 November 1-30, 2019 Paid: 12-05-2019

  • Vouchers for November 1-30, 2019 General Account: Vouchers #19222 – 19236 for $6,770.58; Vouchers #19238 – 19251 for $9,638.71; Vouchers #746099 – 746110 for $4,311.78; Vouchers #746111 – 746117 for $10,974.81.

  • Vouchers for November 1-30, 2019 Capital Account: Vouchers #19237 for $5,069.17; Voucher #17104 - 17105 for $5,682.39.

  • Minutes: November 20, 2019

Fire Chief Report:

  • 2019 Budget / Emergency Response Report /Operations/ Community Risk Reduction

Assistant Chief Report:

  • Volunteer Recruitment & Retention / Training

Firefighters Association Report:

Unfinished Business:

  • Professional Service Contract for Legal Services

New Business:

Special Events:

  • 12-17-2019 Holiday Gathering – Layla’s 1800-2100

Board for Volunteer Firefighters

Public Comment:

Commissioner Comments:

Executive Session:

Adjournment:

manson parks logo

Special Board Meeting
142 Pedoi Street, Bumgarner Building, December 3, 2019, 4:10pm

I. Call to order
II. Flag salute
III. Approval of Resolution 2019-04, authorizing an increase in the regular 2020 property tax levy
IV. Leffler property earnest money agreement

AAT logo
 
A Great Way to support the Orchard!
 
Looking for a special gift to commemorate a memory or loved one, a stocking-stuffer, or to create a sense of caring and nurturing in a young person? Consider giving an adopted tree at the Buckner Orchard for 2020.
 
If the Buckner Orchard is going to continue as the treasure we know it to be, it must have caretakers now, as well as long into the future. What better way to ensure that future than by giving a child a gift of a tree!
 
The response of children who received trees is touching. They picked out their trees, wanting "to grow up" with a younger tree, pulling weeds, placing mouse guards, and running water to "their tree". They have become attached to "their" tree and now have a wonderful opportunity to care and help nurture a living thing for many years to come.
 
TREES ARE NOT JUST FOR CHILDREN!. Maybe you know someone who doesn't get to Stehekin often enough, who has a special memory of the Orchard, or you just want to support the work of the Foundation in caring for the Orchard? The adoption of trees also raises awareness of the Orchard and its care. 
 
Adopt-A-Tree is one way in which you can support the work of the Foundation in caring for the Buckner Orchard.  With your support much can be done to protect and conserve the heritage of this national treasure, and to continue its place as an important part of the Stehekin Community.
 
Adopt a tree for yourself and be a part of the Buckner Orchard!
 
Adopt-A-Tree funds are used exclusively to support the care and maintenance of the Buckner Orchard and are tax deductible.
 
HOW TO ADOPT A TREE
Step 1. E-mail us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to ensure a certificate arrives in time, providing the first and last name of the person the gift is being given to, as well as the address to which you would like it sent.  Be sure to include your e-mail address; this saves the Foundation both time and money in getting the receipt to you.
 
A personal message may be included on the certificate, such as, With love and fond memories, from Aunt Cinda and Uncle Jim.  You choose the one-line wording.
 
Step  2. Mail a check (@$25.00 per tree) to the Buckner Homestead Heritage Foundation,  PO Box 184, Manson, WA 98831. Because some may be given as Christmas gifts, a certificate will be mailed immediately, trusting that the appropriate payment will be forthcoming.
 
Certificates can also be sent to you in PDF format via e-mail, ready to print from your computer, name of the recipient included.  Let us know your preference.
 
RENEWALS
This is also a great time to renew trees adopted during previous years. Please let us know if a new certificate is needed and follow the directions above.
 
Adopt-A-Tree is one of three means by which the Foundation raises funds to support the Orchard and Homestead. The other two are memberships and donations. Please help us today and give a gift of love and caring.
 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Web site:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
The Buckner Homestead Heritage Foundation is a not-for-profit organization created specifically to support and preserve the Buckner Homestead and Orchard in Stehekin, Washington,
and is registered as such with the State of Washington and the IRS
(Tax ID #452913458)

CIW PRESS RELEASE 1

Lake Chelan Tourist Center presents its Second Annual "Lake Chelan Christmas" with The Gothard Sisters Celtic Christmas on Friday December 13th 2019 and Geoffrey Castle's Celtic Christmas on Friday December 20th 2019.

His Second Year in the Lake Chelan Valley, legendary electric violinist Geoffrey Castle brings the Christmas magic with this dazzling concert, featuring the Seattle Irish Dance Company, The Geoffrey Castle Celtic Band, and known Irish troublemaker and Tenor, Dan Connolly. This year's special guests, Seattle Opera’s own Pamela Cassela-Nim & Veronica Nim, and even a visit all the way from the North Pole by the Chief Elf himself and his wife - Santa Claus & Mrs. Claus.

Now in its 14th year, Geoffrey Castle's Celtic Christmas Celebration has become a Northwest Holiday Tradition, bringing communities together to celebrate the magic and mystery of the season, with an Irish flair for fun!

Geoffrey Castle is a living legend on the electric six-string violin. His performance history includes playing music with members of supergroups like Heart, Queen, Journey, Bad Company, YES, Alice in Chains, Soundgarden, Blues Traveler, the Pogues, and the Neville Brothers, while releasing 12 albums on his own independent label and touring and performing all over the world.

The Seattle Irish Dancers are the only professional performance Irish Dance Company in the Pacific Northwest. They've performed with musicians from around the world - Gaelic Storm, The Chieftains, and Celtica Pipes Rock - to name just a few. They perform often with Geoffrey Castle and are excited to come back to the Lake Chelan Valley.

This year Lake Chelan Christmas™ adds a second Concert, The Gothard Sisters Celtic Christmas. Christmas with the Gothard Sisters is a special holiday program featuring Celtic tunes and songs as well as the sisters' joyful and sincere arrangements of Christmas carols old and new. This familyfriendly show includes sibling harmony, Irish step dancing, the sisters' signature humor and heart, and even a Christmas Eve disaster story.

The Gothard Sisters are a dynamic musical group of three sisters who play contemporary Celtic music. Through 10 years performing, touring and writing music together, the optimistic style of their music and performances continue to resonate with their fans, building a loyal international following. Their latest all-original album release, Midnight Sun, reached #6 on the Billboard World Music charts as the highest ranking debut on the chart, and the Gothard Sisters have performed in venues large and small all over the country, including a concert at the Kennedy Center's Millennium stage in Washington DC, performances with Disney Cruise line in Europe, a 21-city concert tour of Japan in 2019, music festivals and performing arts venues nationwide. Blending Celtic, folk, classical, world and northwest musical influences, the Gothard Sisters bring songs to life with violin, acoustic guitar, mandolin, bodhran, djembe, octave violin, whistle and vocal harmonies, creating music that is "vivid, inspirational and captivating." (Tim Carroll, Folk Words Review 2018)

Writing and recording near their home in the Pacific Northwest between touring nationally, the band has released 7 albums and has performed over 1,000 live shows over the course of their career These productions are brought to the Lake Chelan Valley by the Lake Chelan Tourist Center in is efforts of creating Family Friendly Community Events & Entertainment. This Year Lake Chelan Christmas™ is part of the CHRISTMAS IN WASHINGTON™ Concert Series providing Christmas Concerts in Lake Chelan, Leavenworth, Ellensburg, Moses Lake and Omak. Pre-Concert and Intermission Entertainment provided by the Official CHRISTMAS IN WASHINGTON™ Celtic Bagpiper David Wilkie.

Proceeds from these Concerts benefit various Lake Chelan Community Events & Student Programs and the CHRISTMAS IN WASHINGTON™ Scholarship Fund, now benefiting Chelan High School Graduates.

CHELAN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER (PAC)

215 Webster Ave Chelan WA 98816

DATES / TIMES:

THE GOTHARD SISTERS CELTIC CHRISTMAS / DECEMBER 13th 2019 / FRIDAY NIGHT (7pm - 9pm)

GEOFFREY CASTLES CELTIC CHRISTMAS / DECEMBER 20th 2019 / FRIDAY NIGHT (7pm - 9pm)

Box Office Opens at 5:00pm

Doors Open at 6:00pm

Refreshments available for purchase before the Concert and during Intermission as a Fundraiser for the Chelan High School Drama Department.

ORDER TICKETS BY PHONE

CALL ETIX # 1-800-514-3849

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT:

Damascus Rose Floral

311 E Woodin Ave

Chelan WA

LODGING & VIP TICKET PACKAGES

Lakeside Lodge & Suites – Chelan TEL (509) 740-3372

Full Details and Online Tickets at:

www.ChristmasInWashington.com

CHRISTMAS IN WASHINGTON INFO LINE

Tel (509) 682-9150

ed classes flyer

apple jud 2019

Photo L-R Blake Cochran, Teresa Venegas, Delia Lysiak, Cody Fitzpatrick, Bryanna Harris (in front) Zane Mericle, Ryan Gildersleeve, Gunnar Rasmussen, Michah Petersen, Raeauna Mogan

The Manson Grange was the site of the District #7 FFA Apple Judging Career Development Event (CDE). There were over 88 contestants from 19 area schools. The contest was put on by Marty Cochran with help from Nathan Coggins, Travis Schoenwald, Devon Griffith, and Carol Peters. Each

Each contestant had to figure Fruit Maturity days from full bloom, take a 25-question test from the pesticide applicators handbook, identify 20 different insects, judge trays of golden and red delicious, show the proper way to pressure test apples, identify 25 varieties of apples and pears, grade 25 different red delicious and golden delicious apples, and identify 50 different blemishes.

Manson FFA had 11 members competing, they were led by Cody Fitzpatrick who came in first place, followed by Blake Cochran in 11th. Additional members were Teresa Venegas, Delia Lysiak, Bryanna Harris, Raeauna Mogan, Zane Mericle, Micah Petersen, Gunnar Rasmussen, Sam Richmond, and Ryan Gildersleeve. Manson first team placed 5th just missing a trophy by 10 points, Manson second team ended up in placing 8th. Individual members now have their sights set on bringing home some hardware at the state contest to be held in Wenatchee on Dec 11th.

A big “THANK YOU” to Manson Growers for suppling us with all the apples for this year’s contest.

SHOP HAT

The Manson FFA apple judging team along with the shop team travelled to Tonasket to compete against other schools in two fields.

The shop team of Zane Mericle, Micah Petersen, Gunnar Rasmussen, competed in various arc and gas welding competitions.

Micah Petersen and Gunnar Rasmussen took the top two spots in the best bead competition with Micah first place and Gunnar coming in second.

The 12-man Apple Judging team practiced Variety Id, Entomology, Blemish Identification, date and maturity, and grading of apples.

Manson will host the next competition on November 19 at the Manson Grange.

Manson shop students will be host their next contest on Dec 18th.

stc november 29 event cover

Enjoy the magic of the holidays November 29 – December 24

LAKE CHELAN, WA (November 22, 2019) – The Historic Downtown Chelan Association will again host Small Town Christmas, kicking off November 29th and running through December 24, 2019. Small Town Christmas is a month long holiday celebration taking place in the quaint downtown of Chelan, Washington.

Set among the twinkling lights of downtown and the snow-capped buttes of Lake Chelan, Small Town Christmas is reminiscent of a Norman Rockwell postcard scene. The charming downtown will host an incredible line up of family friendly events, unique shopping experiences, and an auction gala that gives back to the youth in our community. The month-long lineup includes:

o Kick off the holiday season in Historic Downtown Chelan for Hot Friday, November 29th! Stroll throughtown to the sounds of holiday music as you take in the stunning window displays, find that unique treasure in one of our charming boutiques, grab an early mimosa, and save with some incredible deals.

o Meet Santa Claus on the Old Bridge, November 29th and escort him to the town Christmas tree during the Parade of Lights. Santa will lead the crowd in a few Christmas carols and count down the lighting of the tree.

o After the town Christmas tree has been lit, make your way to Riverwalk Park for the Fireworks Finale, roast marshmallows, grab a cup of cider and take in the stunning lake setting!

o Don’t miss the opportunity to get fancy and bid on beautifully decorated Christmas trees and wreaths at The Festival of Trees Auction & Dinner Gala on December 7, 2019. Proceeds benefit the Historic Downtown Chelan Association and Thrive Lake Chelan, an organization supporting and empowering the youth in the Lake Chelan Valley.

Event highlights include:November 29-30

 Hot Friday Specials

 Parade of Lights

 Christmas Carols @ the Christmas Tree

 Tree Lighting in Downtown Chelan

 Fireworks & Bonfires

 Small Business Saturday

 Breakfast with Santa

 L-Bow the Elf Performance

 Santa at Frenchie’s Flutes & Fleurs

 Holiday Matinee at the Historic Ruby Theatre

December 1-7

 Holiday Concert at the Tree by Chelan High School

 Festival of Trees Preview

 Graham Cracker Cottages at The Vogue

 Roaming One Man Band

 Santa at Frenchie’s Flutes & Fleurs

 Holiday Matinee at the Historic Ruby Theatre

 Festival of Trees Gala & Auction

December 8-14

 Holiday Crafts & Cookie Decorating at St. Andrews Church

 Santa at Frenchie’s Flutes & Fleurs Kids Crafts at Woven Threads

 Find Santa Downtown for a Candy Cane

 Holiday Matinee at the Historic Ruby Theatre

December 15-22

 Santa at Frenchie’s Flutes & Fleurs

 Holiday Matinee at Chelan Public Library

 Find Santa Downtown for a Candy Cane

Tickets for the Breakfast with Santa and Festival of Trees Gala are limited and available online for purchase – make sure to purchase early!

Small Town Christmas would not be possible without the help of our sponsors – Windermere Lake Chelan, Coldwell Banker, the Kelly Allen Agency and KOZI.

wsdot logoHoliday travel prep is just as important as planning the big meal

OLYMPIA – Just like shopping, prepping the turkey and checking kick-off times before a big holiday gathering, the key to smooth Thanksgiving travel is planning ahead. Being prepared to call an audible for any delays doesn’t hurt either.

The Washington State Department of Transportation urges all travelers to “know before you go” and plan ahead for the busy holiday weekend. Staying informed also lets travelers react to any delays or other issues and still make it to the feast on time.

The agency provides several tools to help plan holiday travels:

·         Consult WSDOT’s travel times charts, which use historical information to help drivers know before they go.

·         Check out online tools, including mobile apps, traffic cameras and email alerts.

·         Visit WSDOT’s online traveler information about traffic, weather and ferry schedules.

·         Follow WSDOT’s social media accounts, such as Twitter and Facebook.

·         Pre-program 530 AM and 1610 AM to vehicle radios for highway advisory radio alerts.

·         Carry chains and other winter driving essentials.

·         Check current chain and traction requirements on the WSDOT mountain passes website or by calling 5-1-1, and watch for highway advisory signs.

·         Leave extra time for holiday and winter travel, slow down and leave extra space between vehicles when driving on snow or ice.

Apple Cup travel

Those traveling to the Friday, Nov. 29, Apple Cup football game in Seattle should prepare for possible winter weather on passes and allow extra time if traveling Thursday evening and Friday morning as people make their way to the 1 p.m. game.

Mountain passes

·         State Route 123 Cayuse Pass and SR 410 Chinook Pass close for the season at 10 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 21, and will not be available for holiday travel. These passes close every winter due to avalanche danger, poor road conditions, lack of snow storage and no emergency response services within close proximity.

·         SR 20 North Cascades Highway remains open as of Wednesday, Nov. 20. Details about the road status and winter closure are available online and travelers should check that the pass is still open before heading out.

·         On Interstate 90, Snoqualmie Pass travelers can receive text alerts for pass delays of 30 minutes or longer – text “wsdot snoqualmie” to 468311 to subscribe, and “wsdot stop” to unsubscribe.

Tolls

In the Puget Sound area, the SR 520 bridge and SR 99 tunnel will have weekend toll rates on Thanksgiving, Nov. 28, returning to weekday rates on Friday, Nov. 29. On the I-405 express toll lanes, travel is free for everyone on the Thanksgiving holiday, returning to normal toll and HOV requirements from 5 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 29. Weekends are always free to travel in the express toll lanes. Out-of-town travelers, including those using rental cars, can learn about toll roads on the Good To Go! visitors page.

Traveling by ferry

Please plan ahead for heavy holiday ferry traffic and consider purchasing tickets online or walking onto ferries if possible to save time. The longest lines are expected westbound the afternoon/evening of Wednesday, Nov. 27 and on Thanksgiving morning. Eastbound, the longest lines are expected Thanksgiving afternoon and Friday morning, Nov. 29. Those driving onto ferries can sign up for vehicle wait time alerts and check terminal conditions online. Some ferry routes run on Saturday schedules on the holiday; check ferry schedules online or call 888-808-7977 for details.

Space is limited on the Port Townsend/Coupeville ferry route on Wednesday, Nov. 27, and Thursday, Nov. 28, due to tidal current cancellations of several evening sailings.

Canadian service is suspended through Sunday, Dec. 8, due to required maintenance on the vessels certified to run international service.

Other travel alternatives

Travelers planning a trip by train, personal aircraft or bus also should make plans to avoid holiday delays:

·         Amtrak Cascades passengers are encouraged to purchase tickets early and should plan to arrive at the station one hour before departure. There are no extra Thanksgiving trains this year. Oregon’s trains will run on their weekend schedule Wednesday, Nov. 27, through Sunday, Dec. 1. All Amtrak Cascades trains require reservations and trains fill up quickly during holidays. Visit www.amtrakcascades.com/  for reservation and schedule details or call 800–USA–RAIL.

·         Information about traveling via state-operated airports is available on line or call 800-552-0666.

·         Check with local public transit agencies for any holiday schedule or service changes, including some Dial-A-Ride and fixed-route service that may not run on holidays.

wsdot logoWSDOT hosts virtual events Nov. 26 and Dec. 11; online open house through Dec. 15

OLYMPIA – People who live in Washington have an opportunity to help create a vision for a transportation system that supports all modes of travel – including walking, biking and rolling. The Washington State Department of Transportation is updating the state active transportation plan, which serves as the needs assessment for accessible pedestrian and bicyclist connections, and public input is needed.

An online open house is available now through Sunday, Dec. 15, at http://bit.ly/WSDOT-ATP-Online-Open-House with a questionnaire to collect input from Washington residents.

WSDOT will also host virtual events during which staff will share information on the safety, mobility and accessibility issues the plan is intended to address. Those who are interested can register at http://bit.ly/WSDOT-ATP-Virtual2019. Participants will be able to submit questions and comments using the chat function in the presentation software. These will be recorded and available online after the presentations.

Virtual events

  • 12 – 1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 26
  • 7 – 8 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 11

Washingtonians are invited to sign up for the plan’s email newsletter to receive future event announcements:  http://bit.ly/WSDOT-2019-ATP.

Community events open to the public that WSDOT staff are attending are listed on the Community Events and E-News page of the online open house. This list is updated as new events are added.

stip

WSDOT seeks input on the draft Statewide Transportation Improvement Program from Nov. 18 to Dec. 17

 OLYMPIA – Each year, the Washington State Department of Transportation develops the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program from local agency, metropolitan and regional transportation improvement programs. This compilation of prioritized transportation improvement projects is now ready for review and public comment.

The draft 2020-2023 STIP is a four-year program of multimodal transportation projects identified through state, metropolitan, regional, tribal and local agency planning processes. Projects identified as using Federal Highway Administration or Federal Transit Administration funds must be included in the STIP in order to authorize the expenditure of federal funds. More than 1,200 statewide transportation improvement projects using $3.4 billion in federal funds are included in the 2020-23 STIP.

The comment period is the final step of the community engagement process that began locally during development of the individual transportation improvement programs. Comments will be accepted until 5 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 17. WSDOT will send any comments it receives to the local agency, metropolitan or regional planning organization for their consideration.

About the STIP

The STIP is a four-year, fiscally constrained, prioritized multimodal transportation program of state, local, tribal, and public transportation (transit) projects. The STIP includes highways, streets, roads, railroads, transit-hubs, park-and-ride lots, bridges, sidewalks, bike lanes, ferry terminals, trails and safety projects.

The collaborative effort between WSDOT, local agencies, metropolitan and regional planning organizations ensures projects are consistent with local, regional and state long-range plans. Some county projects are not included in the draft STIP because state law requires counties to complete their transportation improvement programs by the end of the year; those projects are amended into the final STIP in January.

The current 2019-22 STIP can be viewed online and a similar, searchable database of the 2020-23 STIP will be created in January 2020, following FHWA and FTA approval.

How to comment

Written comments can be sent to: Nancy Huntley, WSDOT, P.O. Box 47390, Olympia, WA 98504-7390, email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or by fax at 360-705-6822.

dougcountysherlogoOn 11-17-19 at approximately 3:46 AM, Douglas County Deputies and East Wenatchee Police Officers responded to a report of a disturbance in the 10 Block of 24th Street NE, East Wenatchee.

When units arrived, the Deputy attempted to contact a vehicle in the driveway of the location. The driver of vehicle, later identified as Brian S. Hamilton, a 35-year-old male out of East Wenatchee, sped away turning towards the deputy. To avoid being struck by the vehicle, the deputy had to push away from the vehicle. The deputy did not sustain any apparent injuries.

Units pursued the vehicle approximately one block where it came to a stop in a church parking lot. Mr. Hamilton refused to comply with units, when contacted. Spike stripes were placed by the tires of the vehicle, to prevent escape.

At one point, Mr. Hamilton armed himself with a sword, while in the vehicle. After over an hour Mr. Hamilton exited the vehicle, but continued to not comply. With the aid of a TASER device, Mr. Hamilton was taken into custody without further incident.

Mr. Hamilton was booked in the Chelan County Jail for Assault-First Degree, Violation of a Domestic Violence No Contact Order, and Driving While License Suspended-Third Degree.

manson parks logo

Regular Board Meeting
142 Pedoi Street, Bumgarner Building, November 14, 2019, 4:10pm
I. Call to order
II. Flag salute
III. Agenda additions and deletions
IV. Public comment
V. Approval of Minutes
a. October 10, 2019 regular meeting minutes
VI. Financial Review
a. Review monthly financial report
b. Review and approve monthly voucher
VII. Old Business
a. Singleton Park playground renovation
b. Shoreline erosion
c. Director’s Report
VIII. New
a. 2020 preliminary budget
b. 2020 value & levy estimate
IX. Adjournment
Next Regular Meeting: December 12, 2019 at 4:10pm, 142 Pedoi Street, Manson, WA 98831

Many activities were held at Manson elementary, middle and high schools on Friday, November 8th!

The day got off to a great start by honoring our veterans with a special breakfast of pancakes, bacon and eggs and a perfect cup of coffee all prepared and served by Manson high school students. Assemblies were also held at both schools where many veterans were in attendance. Students had an opportunity to thank each Veteran with a hand shake and a hello!

During this month of honoring our Veterans, a school-wide Penny War was also going on to benefit our friends at the Tatley Outpost build 3 tiny homes on their Veteran run farm. The class that earned the most gets to take a field trip to the farm, do some yoga therapy, do some work and help with the tiny home project. A total of $2,125.17 was collected by all our students. As a nice surprise, local business “Chelan Fresh” also donated $1,000 to Tatley Outpost making the total donation of $3,135.17.

Thank you for your service Veterans!

CC sheriff logo 2018Sheriff Brian Burnett reports a Seattle man was rescued on Tuesday evening (11/05/2019) after suffering a significant fall on Sunday while descending Cannon Mountain. Ryan Cairnes - 36 years of age – suffered serious injuries in the fall, but eventually made his way to a trail on Tuesday evening where rescuers located him. He was transported to Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee where he is in stable condition with fractures to his neck, right knee, scapula and also rib injuries.

The initial call to the Sheriff’s Office reporting Cairnes as a potentially overdue climber was made on Monday at about 2:00pm by his mother in Pennsylvania. She advised that they had last heard from Cairnes at 4:05pm on Sunday – via text - while he was near the summit of Cannon Mountain which is approximately nine miles southwest of Leavenworth, WA. Family believed Cairnes had planned to be out Sunday evening, but was not certain of his itinerary and had little additional information. A search and rescue deputy with the Sheriff’s Office located Cairnes’ vehicle parked at the Stuart Lake Trailhead on Monday at 3:45pm.

On Tuesday morning, when it was determined Cairnes had not returned to his vehicle, nor made any attempts to contact family or friends, a search was initiated via air and ground assets. A Sheriff’s Office helicopter began flying a search area above Cannon Mountain and eventually located what were believed to be human tracks in the snow descending the west side of the mountain. The aircraft encountered 40-knot winds during the initial search. As the winds subsided, a team of two Chelan County Mountain Rescue personnel were inserted to a point at which they could reach the summit and begin following the tracks down the west aspect of the mountain. By 4:45pm the team could not see a continuation of the tracks as they descended the slope around the 6,000 foot elevation. Darkness set in and the search team began making their way back to the Stuart Lake Trail. As the mountain rescue members were working their way down to the trailhead, they located Cairnes on the trail. He was conscious and alert with significant injuries from the fall he suffered on Sunday. A rescue team with a wheeled litter was requested and Cairnes was taken to the trailhead where a Cascade Medical Center ambulance was staged. Cairnes was transported to the hospital in Wenatchee.

During an interview with Cairnes at the hospital on Wednesday morning, he told a Sheriff’s Office search and rescue coordinator that he believed he was going to die as he began sliding and tumbling down the mountain on Sunday afternoon. Cairnes stated he began descending the mountain summit (8,500ft elevation) shortly after sending the text to his mother in Pennsylvania on Sunday at 4:00pm. He was not having any issues during the descent until he encountered a boulder field around the 5,500 foot elevation level and was forced to alter his course to continue the decline. Cairnes said that while in a couloir, he “slipped” on what he believes was ice and began sliding uncontrollably down slope bouncing off of boulders and over ledges. Cairnes believes he slid and fell nearly 400 feet down the slope prior to coming to rest near the base of the mountain sustaining the many injuries to his body. Cairnes was wearing a climbing helmet and backpack with overnight and survival gear which he credits with cushioning some of the impacts. The backpack stayed intact during the fall and he was able to utilize his sleeping bag to stay warm through Sunday night. Cairnes did not have an emergency beacon or any cellular service to call for assistance and realizes now that he had not been specific with anyone concerning his climbing itinerary.

Due to his injuries, Cairnes made the decision to remain in place on Monday and only maneuvered himself over to a waterfall so he would have drinking water. His hope was that someone had called to report him as overdue (which did not occur until Monday afternoon).

Cairnes decided that on Tuesday morning he would begin trying to hike his way out to the west toward the Stuart Lake Trail. The injuries to his neck, scapula and ribs prevented him from carrying his backpack. He found a branch to use as a walking stick to support his very injured right knee and decided to only carry his water bottle, helmet and sleeping bag. Cairnes said he spent nearly all of Tuesday working his way to the west where he knew the trail existed. He observed the Sheriff’s Office helicopter flying in the area, but was not able to make himself visible to the crew. Cairnes entered into a forested area prior to nightfall and eventually made it down to the Stuart Lake Trail at nearly the same time the mountain rescue members were hiking back toward the trailhead (6:05pm).

Cairnes stressed that he feels lucky to be alive and appreciates the efforts of Chelan County Mountain Rescue and the Sheriff’s Office.

dougcountysherlogoCase# 19D06280

On November 2nd at approximately 7:36 AM Rivercom dispatched a Deputy to a report of a stolen vehicle, later identified as a Palisades School bus, which was left abandoned on the side of Palisades Road in the 1400 block. It was also discovered a maintenance building by the Palisades school was entered and a window was broken.

The suspects stole an air compressor, power tools, yard tools and some fuel from a barrel on site. From video footage recovered from the bus, the two individuals responsible for the stolen bus are Devon R. Taylor, a 27-year-old male out of East Wenatchee, who is currently in custody and Jordan S. McCullough-Cheney, a 19-year-old male, out of Wenatchee, who is still at large.

If you have knowledge of Jordan S. McCullough-Cheney’s whereabouts please contact Rivercom dispatch at 509-663-9911.

Case# 19D06317

On November 3rd, 2019 at approximately 6:39 PM Deputies responded to a Harass/Threats complaint in the 200 block of West Maple Street, Waterville. Deputies received information a firearm may be involved with the threats.

While enroute, Rivercom received multiple calls reporting possible gunshots from the same general area. One person who reported the possible gunshots saw a male without a shirt, carrying a rifle. The male with the gun was gone when Deputies arrived in the area.

After interviewing the people involved, it was learned Dylan L. O’Gara Smith a 21-year-old male out of Waterville, called a 15-year-old Waterville resident and threatened to hurt him over a past incident. Deputies located Dylan at his residence, in his shop and arrested him without incident. The shotgun used in the threats was recovered.

Dylan was transported and booked into Chelan County Jail for Assault in the 1st degree, Felony Harassment – Threats to kill, Unlawful Carrying of a Firearm, Reckless Endangerment and Communicating with a Minor for Immoral Purposes.

wf2020