FAA logo 250$9.4 million in grant funding awarded

OLYMPIA – Work to rejuvenate state airports is getting a much-needed lift, thanks to a recent supplemental appropriation provided to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Three Washington airports will receive a share of $9.4 million from the Airport Improvement Program, which helps fund projects that strengthen aviation infrastructure.

Davenport Municipal Airport outside of Spokane, will use $3.5 million for rehabilitation work and to extend the runway. $4.8 million will go to Jefferson County International Airport to improve the runway. Arlington Municipal Airport will see $1.1 million for taxiway rehabilitation with work already underway.

“The timing of this is perfect and fits well into our planned improvements,” said Dave Ryan, Arlington Municipal Airport Manager. “This will also allow us to move forward with the taxiway lighting project at the same time.”

This is the second round of funding from the U.S. Transportation budget – the first round in September 2018 provided Pullman-Moscow Regional Airport $7 million to assist with an ongoing runway construction project.

AIP grants are under the additional supplementary funding authorized by congress for airport infrastructure. Since this addition to the FAA program is 100% funded, it may allow for additional federal discretionary funds and state funding from WSDOT Aviation to go toward other airport infrastructure projects. Airport sponsors should watch for additional supplemental funds as congress makes them available in the future.

portchelancountyThe Board of Commissioners of the Port of Chelan County will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, May 29th, 2019 beginning at 5:30 pm at Confluence Technology Center, located at 285 Technology Center Way, Wenatchee, WA 98801.

The purpose of the meeting is to hear public comment on the potential functional consolidation of the Port of Chelan County and the Port of Douglas County into a single, regional Port Authority.

A Tri-Commissioner meeting will be held earlier in the day to discuss this and other issues:

The Board of Commissioners of the Port of Chelan County will attend the Tri Commission Meeting on Wednesday, May 29th, 2019 beginning at 1:00 pm at Confluence Technology Center, located at 285 Technology Center Way, Wenatchee, WA 98801.

AGENDA

Chelan County Tri-Commission Meeting
May 29, 2019
1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Confluence Technology Center
285 Technology Center Way
Wenatchee, WA 98801
Agenda
1) Call to Order, Flag Salute, Introductions
2) Issue Discussion (lead)
a. Functional Consolidation of Port Districts (Port)
b. Strategic Planning (PUD)
i. Rock Island Relicensing and Early-Action Investments
c. Surplus Land for Substations (County)
3) Updates (lead)
a. Cashmere Mill District (Port)
b. Annual Growth Planning Meeting (PUD)
c. Columbia River Treaty (PUD)
d. Pangborn Commercial Air Service (Port)
e. Microsoft Agreement (PUD)
i. PUD Fiber Expansion and use of Broadband Programs
f. Facilities Planning and Headquarters Redevelopment (PUD)
4) Updates from the Mayors
a. Mayor Kuntz (Wenatchee)
b. Mayor Cooney (Chelan)
c. Mayor Farivar (Leavenworth)
d. Mayor Fletcher (Cashmere)
e. Mayor Alt (Entiat)
5) Commissioner Comments
6) Adjourn

brush fire 5 22 19

Chelan County Fire Protection District 8 and Chelan Fire and Rescue responded to a report of an orchard burn that got out of containment around 11:58 hours today (05/22/2019).

Battalion 7 was the first unit to arrive in the area and report a working brush fire. Units from Chelan County Fire Protection District 8 and Chelan Fire and Rescue, United States Forrest Service, Department of Natural Resources and Bureau of Land Management joined the effort to quickly help contain the fire.

The fire was located up the Chelan Butte Road off Stayman Flats Road. Much of the fire was contained between two orchards, but the north end was open to traveling up the Chelan Butte.

Resources rapidly knocked down the main body of fire and stopped fire spread on the north end followed by full containment. Units on scene are now mopping up hot stops.

The leaders of the involved fire agencies had just completed a meeting at Station 81 in Entiat and were still in the area make resources more available.

At 13:16 hours fire was knocked down and crews were working to finish containment. Fire was about three acres.

 blue spirits 800

The Port of Chelan County has entered into a lease agreement for its second tenant at the Port’s Cashmere Mill District Business Park. Blue Spirits Distilling, a Chelan based distillery, has agreed to lease 6,800 square feet. This business expansion is expected to create 8 new jobs and result in private investment exceeding $500,000 in Chelan County. Just as important, small distilleries are an emerging industry contributing significant tax revenues to the State of Washington. In response to the news, Port of Chelan Commission Vice President Donn Etherington stated, “The Port is pleased with the strong market demand for the two 16,500 square foot buildings currently under construction by the Port. Our goal of creating new jobs and attracting private investment to the Cashmere Mill District site is being realized.”

The founder of Blue Spirits Distilling, Jeff Soehren, stated, “Our business has been experiencing rapid growth and it was critical for us to secure additional processing, warehousing and distribution space for our distillery operation. The Port Commission’s vision to constructed general-purpose shell buildings at its Cashmere Mill District Site could not have come at a better time for our expanding business.” Blue Spirits Distilling started in Chelan. They currently have two facilities in Leavenworth, a tasting room downtown and an event space, food, & cocktail lounge on Highway 2. This new addition will allow Blue Spiritsto expand its creative footprint by distilling bespoke whisky’s, including Rye, Bourbon and a Bavarian style Single Malt. This facility will allow Blue Spirits customers to experience all aspects of whisky production from grain processing through to barrel aging. Customers can even purchase their own barrels to commemorate this event and be able to taste them as they age.

Chelan County Commission Chairman Kevin Overbay commented, “Chelan County made a financial contribution from its dedicated economic development sales tax fund to assist the Port in constructing the buildings at the Cashmere Mill District Site. It is great to see an immediate return to the citizens of Chelan County.” “Cashmere is excited to see the economic development activities surrounding the Port’s development of the Cashmere Mill District Business Park. It is resulting in new jobs and private investments. I would like to thank the Port Commissioners for their leadership and vision,” said Cashmere Mayor Jim Fletcher.

Both buildings are expected to be completed this summer. Previously, the Port announced Hurst International, a Chatsworth, California based fruit label printer and labeling equipment manufacturer agreed to lease 6,500 square feet. The Port’s investment in the new buildings will exceed $6.7 million. Last summer, Chelan County Commissioners approved a $500,000 economic development sales tax grant for the project.

The Port of Chelan County is the lead economic development agency for the County. Three elected Port Commissioners govern the Port: JC Baldwin, Donn Etherington and Rory Turner.

 10 year ava

Washington's Most Exciting AVA Turns 10!

Winterfest fans, join us for a special weekend of wine to celebrate the 10 year anniversary of Lake Chelan’s official designation as an American Viticulture Area (AVA)! This June 7-8, acquaint your taste buds and discover new wines made from Washington’s most exciting AVA with a weekend of educational and social events.

FRIDAY, JUNE 7

Welcome Reception: Taste a selection of AVA wines alongside paired bites, and watch a commemorative video debut at the Lake Chelan Chamber of Commerce. | 6-8pm

SATURDAY, JUNE 8

Tasting Seminar: The Pioneers of the Lake Chelan AVA | 10am
Tasting Seminar: Lake Chelan AVA - A Balancing Act from North to South | 1:30
Grand Tasting: Celebrating the Food & Wine of the Lake Chelan Wine Valley, at Larc Hill Vineyard Ranch | VIP Hour 6-7pm | General 7-9pm

More Information, Tickets & Weekend Passes Available at: VINTAGELAKECHELAN.COM

port 5 21 19

May 21, 2019 - On May 17th the Port of Chelan County was presented with the Washington Public Port Association’s 2019 Creative Partnership Award for its role in the creation and evolution of the Pybus Public Market on the Wenatchee Waterfront. Pictured above receiving the award is Port Executive Director Jim Kuntz, Commissioner Donn Etherington and Commission President JC Baldwin.

The success of the Pybus Public Market was possible due to multi-faceted partnerships with the City of Wenatchee, the federal government, State of Washington, private investors, and non-profits.

The Port of Chelan County purchased the 28,000 square-foot warehouse in 2010 to stimulate private investment on the Wenatchee waterfront, create a yearround public market, and provide a permanent home for the seasonal Wenatchee Valley Farmers Market. This vision captured the attention of the community. This led to financial support from U.S. Senator Patty Murray’s office, the City of
Wenatchee, Local Revitalization Funding from the state, and a generous private donation. This culminated with a $5.75 million investment into reconstruction of the core and shell followed by many millions more invested by tenants locating in the Market.

The Market opened in May of 2013 with great success. In early 2017, the Port sold the Market to the Pybus Charitable Foundation. In 2018, the Port and the Charitable Foundation started another chapter with its Pybus Partnership. The Port entered into a five-year lease with the Foundation for the newly constructed second floor of the Pybus Annex in order to attract tech entrepreneurs to Chelan County and stimulate economic development. The Port’s Business Incubator currently has its first tenant in place: Subsplash, a Seattle-based software company.

track girls

L-R Kendall Petre & Cara Hutton

track boys

Qualifying athletes : Cole Beazley, Bailey Cameron, Ty Charlton, Braden Getzin, Cara Hutton, Jonathon Morales, Jose Pascasio, Kendall Petre, Marco Sanchez and Connor and Grant Torgesen.

Manson qualifies 11 athletes to compete in state track tournament in Cheney May 23-25, 2019 in both track and field events.  

The boys track team of 2019 earned both the district and league championship title this year. A first in school history.

Congratulation and Go Trojans!

colville logoPUBLIC NOTICE

The Colville Tribes Land Use Review Board will be holding a public hearing to make a ruling on the following shoreline development conditional use permits:

  1. Colville Tribal Federal Corporation has submitted a land use and development permit application to develop an RV Park at their existing Casino site in Mill Bay on Tribal Tract MA-08 commonly known as 455 Wapato Lake Road, Manson, WA.

A public hearing for the above mentioned Conditional Use Permits will be conducted on Wednesday May 29, 2019, at the Colville Tribes Public Works Department located at 12 Lakes Street (Colville Indian Agency) starting at 9:30 a.m.    

Written comments will be accepted until Tuesday May 28, 2019 at 4 p.m. or comments can be made verbally at the public hearing.

All comments may be sent to Pete Palmer, Land Use/Shoreline Administrator, Public Works Department, P.O. Box 150, Nespelem, WA 99155 or they can be emailed to her attention at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Contact the Tribal Public Works Department at the afore-mentioned address or phone number to request a copy of the permit documents.

toaster fireAt 6:38 AM on 5/17/19, Chelan Fire & Rescue responded to a structure fire in the 100 block of S. Robinson Street. The homeowner called 9-1-1 and reported that smoke was filling the house and that all occupants had been evacuated.

When firefighters arrived they located an older model toaster that had malfunctioned and was the cause of the smoke. It was quickly removed from the residence and firefighters cleared the smoke from the residence and turned the property back over the homeowner. Nno further damage to the residence was reported.

Chelan Fire & Rescue would like to remind everyone that even though an appliance is not in use it can malfunction and potentially become a fire hazard. It is recommended that residents unplug small appliances when not in use as an important step in reducing the risk of a fire starting in your home.

Firefighters also discovered there were outdated and non-working smoke alarms in the residence. Fire & Rescue personnel checked all other smoke alarms and replaced those that were not working.

Smoke alarms save lives by providing early warning when a fire starts. All residents are encouraged to install, test and maintain their smoke alarms.

wsdot logoUse WSDOT tools, allow extra time for holiday weekend traffic

OLYMPIA – With summer-like weather already here, travelers hitting the road this Memorial Day weekend should prepare for additional traffic – especially during peak travel times.

By following these steps, travelers can plan ahead for wherever they’re headed during the three-day weekend:

  • Check the Washington State Department of Transportation's best times to travel charts to help plan your trip and avoid congestion.
  • Get informed about WSDOT's online tools, including the WSDOT mobile app, traffic cameras and email alerts.
  • Visit online traveler information for traffic, weather and ferry schedules.
  • Follow WSDOT's social media accounts, such as Twitter and Facebook.
  • Pre-program your vehicle radio to 530 AM and 1610 AM for highway advisory radio alerts.
  • Call 5-1-1 for updated road conditions.
  • Allow extra time for travel to avoid rushing or distraction.

Most state highway construction work is suspended through the holiday weekend – including Monday, May 27 – to ease congestion. However, please stay alert for new lane shifts or work zone staging areas that may remain in place.

Snoqualmie Pass

No lane closures or other construction is planned on Interstate 90 from Friday, May 24, until to Tuesday, May 28. However, the usual holiday increase in traffic volumes means travelers should expect delays, especially eastbound on Friday, May 24, and westbound Monday, May 27. Receive text message alerts about significant delays by texting the number 468311 with the words "WSDOT Snoqualmie."

Chinook and Cayuse passes

Both Chinook Pass, State Route 410, and Cayuse Pass, SR 123, are expected to be open in time for the Memorial Day weekend, but exact dates and other details are still being finalized. Check the Chinook and Cayuse passes webpage for updates as the holiday approaches. Both these passes close each winter due to weather and hazardous conditions.

Tolling

In the Puget Sound, weekend toll rates will be in effect on Monday, May 27, on the State Route 520 bridge. The Interstate 405 express toll lanes will be free and open to all drivers on the Monday holiday. Out-of-town travelers, including those using rental cars, can learn about toll roads and short term account options on the Good to Go! visitors page.

Travelers making a trip by ferry, train, personal aircraft or bus also should plan ahead to avoid holiday delays:

  • Anticipate heavy ferry traffic for the holiday and plan accordingly. Peak travel times on most routes are expected to be westbound Thursday and Friday, May 23-24, and eastbound, Monday, May 27. Check the Washington State Ferries website, www.wsdot.wa.gov/ferries/, or call toll-free 888-808-7977 for details, including reservations on some routes. Customers also can bypass vehicle lines by traveling as a walk-on passenger.
  • Amtrak Cascades passengers are encouraged to purchase tickets early and should plan to arrive at the station one hour before departure. All Amtrak Cascades trains require reservations. Visit www.amtrakcascades.com/ or call 800–USA–RAIL for details.
  • For information about traveling via state-operated airports, visit www.wsdot.wa.gov/aviation/airports/Amenities.htm or call 800-552-0666.
  • Check with local public transit agencies for any holiday schedule or service changes, including some Dial-A-Ride and fixed-route service that may not run on holidays

West tie down apron expansion starts May 28, requires no runway closures 

methow airport 450WINTHROP – Pilots will have access to an updated tie down area after Methow Valley State Airport gets its long-awaited apron layout expansion. Work starts May 28 with plans for new spaces to open after approximately 30 days.

Visiting pilots will not encounter any delays or runway closures while using the airport during the construction. However, pilots should still regularly check Notices to Airmen.

This update will also expand this airport’s apron into compliance with Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) design standards. This expansion adds three additional parking positions designed for the critical design aircraft. There will be 54.49 foot spacing between tie down points and seven more parking positions for smaller aircraft with 34 foot spacing between tie down points. Some of the new tie downs will better accommodate aircraft with wingspans in the typical range of 30 – 38 feet.

The spacing of tie down points for smaller aircraft was one of the highlighted issues after the completion of last year’s $5 million pavement rehabilitation project at the airport. This project was originally intended to be included as part of last year’s pavement rehabilitation work, but due to availability and timing of federal funding, the apron expansion was be re-bid in Fall 2018 for construction this Spring/Summer 2019.

The contract was awarded to Wenatchee general contractor, Selland Construction, in the amount of $1.26 million.

Construction costs are split between the FAA Airport Improvement Program and Washington State Department of Transportation Aviation. The FAA is supporting 90 percent and WSDOT Aviation is supporting 10 percent of the total cost. 

Drainage system improvements with this project include a new underdrain system along the perimeter of the expanded aircraft apron. The new underdrain system will flow into existing drainage structures, infiltration ponds, or adjacent infield areas.

The project was designed by Denver based engineering firm Jviation, who will also provide construction management services during the project

Methow Valley State Airport in Winthrop is the largest of 16 WSDOT-managed airports, serving commercial aircraft that weigh up to 30,000 pounds. The airport also supports Washington’s smoke jump base, medical evacuation flights, wildland firefighting staging and more.

STEELE fix

Washington State Legislator Mike Steele visited Manson High School on Monday May 6th to share information about the award his family sponsors each year, the Mel Steele Memorial Award.

Mel (Mike’s Uncle) was a standout athlete and student who was killed in a tragic football injury while he was a student at Manson High School.

Each year Representative Steele visits with seniors and shares the attributes his family admired in Mel and those that Manson Staff Members look for in one senior student who is awarded the medal and scholarship.

Manson seniors thanked Representative Steele for his work in the 2019 Legislative Session and in particular for his work in securing $400,000 in funds to assist in building an Early Childhood Center on Manson’s campus.

His leadership and advocacy in the Capital Budget process is very much appreciated by Manson students, staff and families.

ChelanFireRescueLogo200AGENDA

Chelan Fire and Rescue

Wednesday, May 15, 2019 at 3:00 P.M.

232 East Wapato, Chelan, WA

Proposed Chelan Fire and Rescue agenda pending Board approval.

Flag Salute:

Call to Order:

Approve Agenda:

Public Comment:

Consent Agenda:

  • Revenue and Expenditure Report: April 2019

  • Payroll: $131,886.35 April 1-30, 2019 Paid: 05-05-2019

  • Vouchers for April 2019 General Account: Vouchers #18759 – 18776 for $12,730.93; Vouchers #18777 – 187892 for $32,340.56; Vouchers #18791 – 18800 for $7,269.11.

  • Vouchers for April 2019 Capital Account: None

  • Minutes: April 17, 2019

Fire Chief Report:

  • 2019 Budget / Emergency Response Report / Facilities/Apparatus/Equipment

    • Deputy Chief Operations Report: Operations / Fire Prevention / Public Education / Career Staff

    • Assistant Chief of Volunteer Services: Volunteer Recruitment and Training / Volunteer Staff

Firefighters Association Report:

Unfinished Business:

  • Ladder 71

  • Rescue Boat

  • LRP Presentation to the Public

New Business:

Special Event:

  • 05-17-19-2019 WSFFA 96th Conference – Wenatchee Convention Center

  • 05-18-2019 WSFFA Banquet 6 p.m. – Volunteer Firefighter of the year award – Jonathan Mendoza

  • 05-20-2019 WFC Conference – Kennewick / Chief Donnell and Chief Asher

  • 05-23-2019 Memorial Day Parade

  • 05-30-2019 CFR Town Hall Meeting – Chelan Senior Center 6-8

Board for Volunteer Firefighters

  • Invoices

Commissioner Comments: No action to be taken.

Executive Session: None

Adjournment:

Vessel Prior to Boom Deploy

Vessel prior to boom deployment

Vessel After Boom Deploymen

Vessel after boom deployment

(CHELAN) - Sheriff Brian Burnett reports a partially submerged vessel on Lake Chelan initiated a “spill response” due to leaking diesel fuel Tuesday afternoon (05/07/2019). Emergency management personnel from the Sheriff’s Office were notified by State Department of Ecology (DOE) just after 4:00pm concerning a 29ft sailboat which was approximately 60% submerged along the south shore of the lake just down lake of the 25 Mile Creek USFS dock.

A DOE Spill Response Team responded from Yakima while Chelan County Emergency Management personnel responded to assess the situation and begin boom deployment around the derelict vessel. By 9:30pm the vessel had been surrounded by boom and absorbent material to mitigate the diesel flow out into the lake.

An attempt to locate the owner of the vessel at several different locations in Chelan was unsuccessful Tuesday evening.

The investigation concerning what caused the large sailboat to sink is ongoing.

The boat will need to be removed from the lake which will require a contractor specializing in the removal of submerged vessels. The Dept. of Ecology and Sheriff’s Office are working collaboratively to make this happen as soon as possible. The spill is currently contained.

ab2019

For all the information on the 99th Manson Apple Blossom Festival go to https://moretomanson.com/events/manson-apple-blossom-festival-2019.

 

CC sheriff logo 2018ENTIAT – Chelan County emergency management officials are reminding mushroom hunters headed into areas burned by the Cougar Creek Fire to be vigilant about keeping up to date on weather forecasts and having a pre-planned escape route in the event of seasonal rain showers.

The Cougar Creek Fire was one of the largest wildfires in the state last year, burning more than 42,700 acres in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. The Entiat Ranger District is preparing for a busy mushroom season – and the hundreds of people it may attract.

The impact of rainfall over a recently burned area can be severe, warned Sgt. Kent Sisson of the Chelan County Department of Emergency Management. A burned surface may not absorb even light to normal rainfall, causing the precipitation to travel quickly, taking rocks, boulders, dirt and other debris with it and potentially overwhelming drainage systems, Sisson explained.

In fact, debris flows can move at up to 60 miles an hour on steep slopes, according to information from the National Weather Service.

“In Central Washington, we’re headed into thunderstorm season,” Sisson said. “While locals know there is no cell phone service in most of the Entiat Valley, visitors may not realize this. So we hope to help people understand that if a thunderstorm hits, or if it rains, there may be little warning of a debris flow event.”

Chelan County shares the following tips with not only mushroom hunters but also other people recreating in burned areas:

  • Watch for hazards in burns areas. Snags and damaged trees – blackened killed trees or green trees burned through at the bottom – can fall at any time. Or they can block trails or roads, including your exit if you should need to leave quickly during a rainstorm.

  • Before you head out for the day, look at the weather forecast. If you are in an area that does not have cell phone service, consider purchasing or bringing along an NOAA weather radio to keep up on weather events.

  • Have your escape plan in place prior to a weather event occurring. Maps are available for purchase at the Entiat Ranger District, 2108 Entiat Way. Be familiar with your surroundings.

  • Move to higher ground in the case of a rain event. Do not drive across flooded roads or washes or wade through flooded areas. Rapidly flowing water can easily sweep you off your feet.

  • Leave the area immediately in the case of a summer thunderstorm. If you see the tell-tale signs of a thunderstorm – rapidly rising cumulus clouds, a darkening sky, lightning in the distance and an increase in the wind – do not hesitate to get to a safe zone.

  • Always tell someone where you are going when headed into the forest and when to expect you back. Search crews will not be able to reach you if they don’t know you’re in the forest.

Lastly, Sisson stresses that a little preparation can go a long way in having a successful mushroom harvest this year.

“Checking the weather and being aware of your surroundings are things we should all be doing when we go into the forest,” Sisson said. “It is especially vital when recreating in these burned areas.”

Sheriff Brian Burnett reports that Chelan County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a structure fire at 4045 Sunnybank Drive in Chelan, WA in the early morning hours on Saturday, May 4th.

All persons that were present in the home when the fire broke out were able to exit the home without injury.

The fire destroyed the structure, six vehicles and two pets were lost in the blaze.

The cause of this fire is currently under investigation.

Chelan County Sheriff’s Office detectives are looking for any information regarding individuals seen around the area prior, during and after the structure fire. If you have any information, please contact the detectives tip line at 509- 667-6845.

manson parks logo

Regular Board Meeting
142 Pedoi Street, Bumgarner Building, May 9, 2019, 4:10pm

I. Call to Order
II. Flag Salute
III. Agenda Additions and Deletions
IV. Public Comment
V. Approval of Minutes
a. April 11, 2019 regular meeting minutes
VI. Financial Review
a. Review Monthly Financial Report
b. Review and Approve Monthly Voucher
VII. Old Business
a. Leffler Field
b. Director’s Report
VIII. New Business
a. Lanny Armbruster memorial
b. Campground Host wage
c. Yoga program
IX. Adjournment
Next Regular Meeting: June 13, 2019 at 4:10pm, 142 Pedoi Street, Manson, WA 98831

wsdot logoOLYMPIA – Transportation challenges and priorities for residents, businesses and visitors to Okanogan County and the Colville Reservation will be the focus of a two-day visit by the Washington State Transportation Commission to Okanogan County next week. Officials from Okanogan County and its cities, the Colville Tribe, transit providers and other community leaders will participate as part of the commission’s statewide public outreach effort.

During its two-day tour, the commission also will meet with local leaders in Twisp on Tuesday, May 14, and in Omak on Wednesday, May 15, to learn more about local needs and efforts to improve transportation and safety. The meeting in Twisp will start at 11 a.m. Tuesday at Building 9, TwispWorks, 502 S. Glover. The meeting in Omak will take place from 8:30 to 11:10 a.m. Wednesday at Omak City Hall, 2 North Ash St. The meetings are open to the public and persons wishing to speak to the commission may do so during the public comment period scheduled at the close of each meeting.

The meetings feature a series of short presentations on successes and challenges, future plans and needs for transportation in the Okanogan region. Topics include city streets, county and tribal roads, state highways, rail and air transportation, and public transportation. Commissioners will learn about the connections between economic development, tourism, and transportation in the Methow Valley, and cross-border traffic with Canada on US 97. Several presenters, including representatives of Okanogan County will talk about how recent wildfires, floods and landslides have exposed vulnerabilities in the state and local road system, and the decision to identify a primitive road network for disaster response and evacuation.

On May 14, the commission will tour bridges on State Route 153, sites on SR 20 near Loup Loup pass where landslides have recently occurred, a proposed wildlife crossing on US 97, and see causes of flooding problems on the main street in Tonasket.

On May 15, following the meeting in Omak, commissioners will meet with leaders of the Colville Tribe and tour the road system on the reservation.

The Washington State Transportation Commission holds several meetings throughout the state each year to gain insight from local government, industry and citizens about transportation issues that affect their communities and region.  This information helps the commission to develop and implement transportation policies and recommendations that reflect the priorities of the people and local governments of the State of Washington. In meetings later this year, the commission will visit Bremerton, Federal Way, and Skamania County.

For more information about the commission and a complete meeting agenda, visit: www.wstc.wa.gov/

BHHF 2019jpg

piratefest2019

 

Over 400 parents, students and community members participated in Manson’s 2nd Annual Cultural Celebration. Fifteen countries were first researched by students and then aspects of each country’s culture was shared (food, dance, games, art, etc.) with visitors. Each family had a passport (complete with pictures) and earned stamps and chances at prizes.

Two groups of students (high school and 5/6 Options) researched their genetic DNA backgrounds and shared their findings.

Amazing food (courtesy of the Manson food service department – Head Cook Robin Hanson) was served with choices of Italian or Asian themed main courses and desert delicacies: USA apple crisp, Italy gelato, Latin American flan, Swedish vafflor (waffle) , Chinese cookies, Australian chocolate crackle. The night concluded with a World Cup Soccer tournament – Congratulations Team Argentina

we 2

WE Day was a wonderful experience for so many reasons. The organization is all about making a mental shift in thinking from ME to WE.

The most important thing that happened yesterday is that our middle school leadership students participated in a shared experience. At WE Day, they were exposed to problems in the world and empowered to make change.

Maybe more important to our school, these students are motivated to make some cultural shifts within our walls to create this feeling for all Manson students.

Miles club photoManson Miles Club is an 8-week program, offered in both the Fall and Spring, which promotes overall health and fitness for all K-5 Manson Elementary Students, through walking and running laps at lunch recess. 

Students are awarded a foot charm for their Manson Miles Club necklace each time they run or walk 5 miles. 

Students who join the 50 and 75 Mile Clubs earn a t-shirt, donated by Lake Chelan Community Hospital, Lake Chelan Community Hospital Foundation and Club Max. 

This week, 5th Grade Student Hanna Lyman was the first student to join our 75 Mile Club, earning both a t-shirt and necklace token.  Congratulations to Hanna!  We look forward to seeing many more Manson Elementary students follow in your footsteps!

hwy20 crew 800

The crew that headed up to the SR 20 North Cascades Highway on March 20.

Another mountain route for drivers, bicyclists to crisscross Cascades

DIABLO – With the swing of the gates, the seasonal stretch of North Cascades Highway/State Route 20 opened at 9 a.m. today for the 2019 season.

The reopening provides:
• Another route between western and eastern Washington for drivers.
• Access to more miles of US Bike Route 10.
• Access to mind-blowing hiking and gorgeous campgrounds.

The clearing process
The four-week clearing process began on March 25. This week, Washington State Department of Transportation maintenance crews and avalanche technicians completed preparations by causing controlled snow slides to clear chutes above the road, repaired and replaced guardrail and pavement and cleared ditches of debris to channel water from melting snow.

Remember: winter conditions remain
While the road is open, there are still signs of winter along the highway. Those planning hiking, camping or snow activities should prepare for limited parking until snow melts and should not stop or park in the travel lanes.

For safety, people driving and bicycling should obey highway signs and avoid stopping below snow slide areas such as Liberty Bell Mountain east of Washington Pass. There are limited facilities between Diablo and Mazama, so travelers should come prepared with a stocked emergency kit for the trip. Motorcyclists and bicyclists should also expect sand on the road until temperatures warm.

Highway history
The North Cascades Highway officially opened in September 1972. The 37-mile scenic by-way travels through Whatcom, Chelan and Okanogan counties, connecting communities in western Washington’s Skagit River Valley with the Methow Valley in eastern Washington.

Before driving the highway, check real-time traffic conditions. Find closure updates on the:
Whatcom County construction page
WSDOT traffic app
WSDOT Traffic Twitter feed

 

Mrs. Sears computer science class was invited by Microsoft to attend the TEALS (Technology Education and Literacy in Schools) Fair during spring break.

A group of Manson students from the freshman and sophomore classes jumped at the chance.

The trip included a tour of the Microsoft building where all the action happens.

CC sheriff logo 2018(Wenatchee) --- The executive board of the Columbia River Drug Task Force has asked for an outside law enforcement review of possible errors in handling evidence related to a recent seizure of cocaine, firearms and cash.

Board chair and Chelan County Sheriff Brian Burnett has asked the Thurston County Sheriff’s office to handle the investigation to allow for maximum transparency in determining how policies and procedures may not have been followed in accounting for cash seized as a result of the raid earlier in April.

Ten law enforcement agencies were involved in the investigation where drugs, firearms and cash were taken into evidence from two locations in the Wenatchee area and two men were arrested on April 3. The original accounting of cash received was thought to have been more than $80,000 but evidence packaged was found to be closer to $68,000.

“If policies and procedures were not followed during the processing of the scene, it is extremely important we find and correct those types of errors as soon as possible,” Burnett said. It is common for law enforcement agencies to ask other departments who were not involved to conduct the investigations.

During the investigation, Sheriff Burnett and other agencies involved will not have comment on the case and will await the final recommendations and findings from Thurston County Sheriff’s Office. No date for completion of the investigation has been established.

The initial investigation and arrests were the result of months-long planning and removed a lot of illegal drugs from possible distribution to the community. The Columbia River Drug Task Force is comprised of detectives from the Chelan County Sheriff’s Office, Wenatchee Police Department, East Wenatchee Police Department and Washington State Patrol. They were assisted by Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, Department of Homeland Security, Grant County INET Drug Task Force and Chelan County Public Works.

TargetZeroChelan, Douglas, Kittitas and Okanogan County-Extra patrols will be out statewide on Saturday, April 20, 2019. The patrols will be looking for drunk and other drugged drivers, but will enforce all traffic laws.

While the extra patrols will increase the likelihood that someone driving impaired will be arrested and prosecuted, the goal is not to apprehend impaired drivers but to prevent people from driving impaired in the first place.

The warmer weather brings increased travel for vacations, parties, and other gatherings with family and friends. These gatherings often involve alcohol and/or other drugs. As a result, the season also brings an increased number of drivers who are impaired by alcohol and other drugs on our road.

Whether you smoke, eat, vape or dab marijuana this may lead you to becoming impaired and therefore not able to operate a motor vehicle safely. A person may experience more impairment when they mix marijuana with any other drug including alcohol.

When you’re drunk or high, you have big ideas, but not necessarily good ideas. Driving impaired is dangerous which is why most Washingtonians don’t do it or approve of it. Be prepared, be safe and don’t drive drunk or high. Plan ahead and if you see someone impaired, it’s ok to intervene.

Driving a motor vehicle is probably the biggest responsibility we have every day. Most drivers on our roads do the right thing. Most drivers are sober, wear a seat belt and drive within the safe speed limits. We want to thank those responsible drivers and ask that everyone works together to keep your friends and family from driving after consuming any type of drug.

CC sheriff logo 2018Sheriff Brian Burnett reports a 29 year old back country skier was rescued Sunday afternoon after being swept off her skis during a snow slide in the area above of Colchuck Lake.

Shanna Hovertsen of Seattle was skiing with friends at around 1:15pm when a small avalanche caused her to tumble down the slope twisting both of her knees. She was assisted by the other three subjects in the group and escorted to a campsite near Colchuck Lake.

Hovertsen could not hike out under her own power. One of the subjects used an inReach satellite communication device to text a request for assistance to the International Emergency Rescue Communication Center in Texas. The message was relayed to the Washington State Emergency Management communication center at Camp Murray, and then to RIVERCOM dispatch.

A Chelan County Sheriff’s Office helicopter crew was launched from Wenatchee. The helicopter was able to land near the patient.
Hovertsen was flown to the National Fish Hatchery landing pad near Leavenworth by 4:40pm where an ambulance was waiting to transport her to Cascade Medical Center in Leavenworth.

Hovertsen is in stable condition.

CC sheriff logo 2018Sheriff Brian Burnett reports a 36 year old male drowned in Lake Chelan on Saturday afternoon (04/13/2019) when an inflatable kayak he and another subject were in flipped over. Both subjects were ejected into the cold water. The incident occurred north of the dock area at Lake Chelan State Park.

At 2:49pm, RIVERCOM 911 dispatch began receiving calls reference the two subjects in the water. One of the males had not surfaced. Several boaters who were participating in a fishing derby in the area began actively looking for the missing subject. State Park Rangers, Sheriff’s Deputies (with a marine vessel), Chelan County Fire District #7 (with rescue swimmers) and Lake Chelan EMS responded to assist in the search.

It was determined that Bonventure Gitau 36 years of age of Tacoma, WA had not been wearing a personal floatation device when the two-person inflatable kayak he was in with his friend capsized. Gitau was seen momentarily in the water by witnesses but then disappeared under the surface. His friend, Jackson Njaru 31years if age of Puyallup, WA, made it to a nearby boat and was pulled from the water in fair condition.

Just prior to 4:00pm, Gitau’s body was spotted on the bottom of the lake at a depth of about 30 feet. A diver from Fire District #7 made the recovery. The body was released to the Chelan County Coroner’s Office.
The Sheriff’s Office would like to remind everyone planning to recreate in lakes and rivers this season, to please utilize personal floatation devices when in any type of vessel.

diadelninoAll student, staff, parents and community members are invited to join the Manson School District at its cultural celebration on Tuesday, April 30 from 5-8:00 p.m. at Manson High School. Dinner will be served throughout the evening beginning at 5pm.

In conjunction with our annual districtwide Dia del Niño celebration, we invite you to join us in the celebration of our children and embracing cultures from 15 different countries. Many interactive activities will be available for you to participate in. Here is just a sample of what you can do:

  • Family Photo Booth – for family pictures (free of charge)

  • Sample homemade food from around the world

  • Learn how to play games from other countries

  • Participate in a “World Cup” soccer match on the football field

  • Hear about student DNA results.

You may also enjoy listening to songs and watch dances being performed by our elementary students from the Swedish Maypole dance to an Irish Folk dance.

This community-wide family event is open to anyone who wants to have some fun and learn about other cultures. Please join us!

manson parks logo

Regular Board Meeting
142 Pedoi Street, Bumgarner Building, April 11, 2019, 4:10pm
I. Call to Order
II. Flag Salute
III. Agenda Additions and Deletions
IV. Public Comment
V. Approval of Minutes
a. March 14, 2019 Special meeting minutes
VI. Financial Review
a. Review Monthly Financial Report
b. Review and Approve Monthly Voucher
VII. Old Business
a. Leffler Field
b. Director’s Report
VIII. Adjournment
Next Regular Meeting: May 9, 2019 at 4:10pm, 142 Pedoi Street, Manson, WA 98831

buckner logoR E M I N D E R 
It's never too late if you haven't already helped!

BUCKNER HOMESTEAD HERITAGE FOUNDATION MEMBERSHIPS 2019

Supporting the Orchard - it's Personal

Each time I sit down to find creative ways to encourage each of you to support the historic Buckner Orchard through donations, memberships, and volunteer work, I find it easy to list a variety of reasons why you should be a part of what we do.

In my reflections this year, I've come to the realization that support for the Orchard truly is personal.

For me, its easy; Harry Buckner was my grandfather and we lived in the Buzzard Cabin until I was six.  I spent many summers there, including five summers during my college years working for theForest Service on trail crews and fire standby.  During that same time, college friends and I would often spend our Christmas break in a wood stove-heated cabin with no insulation when temperatures dropped into the teens and below.  Evenings were spent playing Yahtzee with Harry and Lena, once snowshoeing to the Buckner home through 18 inches of fresh snow.  Today, retired, my wife, Christine, our two dogs, and I spend as much time as we can volunteering at the Orchard.

We all have our own experiences that make the Buckner Orchard meaningful and personal.  Most are as simple as enjoying the location, the peace and tranquility, the history and beauty, or appreciating the wonderful Common Delicious apples.

Please join me today in supporting the Buckner Orchard, helping ensure that we and future generations have the opportunity to create our own personal experiences and memories!

Herb Sargo

PS - If you missed it, our 2018 Annual Report  provides a great picture of what the Foundation does to support the Orchard.

MEMBERSHIPS

RENEWAL - Your check, made out to the Buckner Homestead Heritage Foundation (BHHF), should be mailed to PO Box 184, Manson, WA  98831.  As a renewal,

we will have your information on file.  Please include your e-mail address, as this is how we receipt and communicate with members in a cost-effective manner.   And,

your contribution is tax deductible as allowed by the IRS.

NEW MEMBERSHIP -  CLICK HERE to download a membership form to print and mail to PO Box 184, Manson, WA  98831.  
Again, be sure to include your e-mail address.

Individual  -  $25.00      Business -  $75.00      Benefactor - $250.00        Sustainer - $1,000.00

Family  -  $50.00           Patron  -  $100.00       Steward  -  $500.00           Donation  -  $  _____

DONATIONS

 Another form of support for the Homestead and Orchard is a donation. Monetary donations may be for a specific purpose or as a non-specific donation to the Foundation.

2019 CALENDAR

    
Monday, May 13 - Annual Meeting, Manson

Thursday, June 13 - Orchard Work Party

Saturday, July 13 or 20 (TBD) - Orchard Work Party

Saturday, August 4 - Square Dance at the Orchard

Monday, August 6 - Summer Board Meeting

Friday, October 4 - Orchard Work Party

Valley Music Night

Saturday, October 5 - Harvest Fest at the Orchard

Sunday, October 6 - Poetry Night

Web Site

Contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

wsdot logoDisplays in Wenatchee, Ephrata & Okanogan honor North Central Region employees who died on the job

WENATCHEE – Each year WSDOT holds a ceremony to remember the 60 workers we’ve lost on the job since 1950, honor our workers injured on the job and remind everyone about the need for work zone safety awareness.

Orange barrels

Last April in Olympia, we placed 60 orange traffic barrels on the Capital Campus along Capitol Way near the WSDOT Headquarters and the Capital Dome.

Each barrel represents one of the 60 WSDOT workers killed on the job since 1950.

The display raised awareness about work zone safety and reminded all travelers that our workers put their lives on the line every day.

This year all the regions are placing individual displays across the state starting Monday, April 8.

North Central Region has three outdoor displays in place through Friday, April 12:

  • North Central Region Office, Euclid Ave., Wenatchee
  • Area 2 Maintenance Office, SR 28, Ephrata
  • Area 3 Maintenance Office, US 97, Okanogan

These displays include an orange Work Zone Safety Banner and four barrels to honor the four employees from our region who died on the job:

  • Frank E. Potter, Dec. 1, 1950, North Central Region, Maintenance Laborer. Frank was killed on US 2 when a car skidded into him while trying to slow down in a work zone east of Leavenworth.
  • Ray Wittig, Feb. 4, 1952, North Central Region, maintenance lead technician. Ray was killed on US 2 when he was buried in a snowslide while working in Tumwater Canyon, west of Leavenworth.
  • Ray T. Collie, Feb. 28, 1970, North Central Region, maintenance technician. Ray died a week after being struck by a truck on US 2 just west of Stevens Pass in a work zone as he was setting cones.
  • Gordon Burlingame, July 17, 1992, North Central Region, Avalanche Control Supervisor. “Gordie” was working alone dismantling a 22-foot high radio tower from the roof of a dormitory building at Berne Camp on Stevens Pass when it became unstable and fell on him.

Employees in work zones are husbands, fathers, brothers, wives, mothers, sisters, children and friends – and they all deserve to go home safe at the end of their day. Far too many of them have had close calls, serious injuries and deaths in our work zones. Our workers have had to literally run for their lives and/or jump over guardrails due to speeding, inattentive/distracted drivers, impairment, etc.

By the Numbers

Nationally:

  • There’s a collision in a work zone every 5.4 minutes
  • About 650 people are killed across the country each year in roadway work zones.

Washington State:

  • Washington averages 768 roadway work zone injuries a year.
  • In 2018:
    • 1,498 reported collisions in a work zone or a related back-up.
    • 615 reported injuries.
    • 11 fatal crashes.
  • Travelers are more at risk in work zones than the workers:
  • In 2018:
    • 94% of our work zone fatalities and injuries were drivers, passengers or pedestrians

Driving Distracted through work zones

Distracted/inattentive driving is now the leading cause of work zone crashes on state highways.

Last year 539 distracted/inattentive driver citations were issued for state work zone crashes.

Our crews say they regularly see drivers looking at phones or other devices and blowing past our signs to slow down or stop; putting everyone on the road at risk.

Those who are speeding or driving under the influence of alcohol, drugs and now electronics (E-DUI) also find those citations are even more expensive as traffic fines are doubled in work zones.

  • First E-DUI ticket - $136
  • Second E-DUI ticket in 5 years - $234
  • All E-DUI tickets are reported to insurance companies and can lead to higher rates.
  • Other forms of distracted driving (not involving electronic devices) earn a $99 ticket

Work zone crashes are almost-always preventable.

The top three reasons for work zone collisions in 2018 were:

  • distracted driving/inattention,
  • following too closely,
  • excessive speed.

We Need Help

Our crews work where traffic is speeding literally inches away and we need your help keeping both you and them safe:

  • Slow Down -- drive the posted speeds, they’re there for your safety.
  • Be Kind – our workers are helping to keep you safe and improve the roadways.
  • Pay Attention -- both to workers directing you and surrounding traffic.
  • Stay Calm -- expect delays, leave early or take an alternate route if possible; no meeting or appointment is worth risking someone’s life.

Both the national and our Washington state Work Zone Awareness events take place during April 8-12.

  • The National Work Zone Awareness Week event is April 9, in Washington, DC.
  • WSDOT’s Worker Memorial ceremony is April 10, in Olympia.
  • April 10 is also national “Wear Orange for Safety Day”.

ChelanFireRescueLogo200On April 4th at 2:55pm Chelan Fire & Rescue crews were dispatched to a reported brush fire in the area of Chelan Ranch Road and Purtteman Gulch Road.  Arriving crews found a fully engulfed chicken coop threatening adjacent structures with fire that had spread into approximately 2 acres of grass and brush behind the residence on Whitetail Lane.  Chelan Fire & Rescue called for a second alarm with notification to CWICC due to the rapid fire spread that was driven by 10 mph winds.  A third alarm was called when the fire threatened nearby structures and the eastern fire spread had moved towards Union Valley. 

This early season fire was eventually brought under control by Chelan Fire & Rescue with mutual aid assistance from Chelan County Fire District 5 (Manson), Chelan County Fire District 8 (Entiat), Douglas County Fire District 4 (Orondo), US Forestry Service, Department of Natural Resources, and Chelan County Sheriff.  Total size for this fire was estimated at 7.5 acres with the only structure loss being the chicken coop.  Cause of the fire is undetermined at this time.

Chelan Fire & Rescue would like to remind all Fire District residents that the 2019 fire season has started early and we expect a busier than normal fire season due to the low moisture snow pack and the drier than normal grass and shrubs.

CC sheriff logo 2018The Columbia River Drug Task Force reports on April 3rd, 2019 related search warrants were served in the 800 block of Malaga Alcoa Highway and the 1500 block of Cashmere Street in Wenatchee. These search warrants were the result of investigations and controlled drug buys conducted by CRDTF detectives.

The Malaga Alcoa Highway location is approximately nine acres and had several structures on it believed to be occupied which made it a complex area to safely clear and search. It was determined the location would be cleared by SWAT prior to a search conducted by detectives. The Chelan County Regional SWAT team as well as Douglas County SRT were utilized for this beginning at approximately 6:30 am. The teams were also assisted by Chelan County Sheriff’s Office, Wenatchee Police Department, East Wenatchee Police Department, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Washington State Patrol, Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, Department of Homeland Security, INET Drug Task Force from the Grant County area, and Chelan County Public Works.

While searching the property, Detectives located and seized approximately two pounds of cocaine, two firearms, packaging material for the distribution of cocaine, and over $80,000 in cash as suspected proceeds from the sale of illegal drugs. The property owner, 52 year old Cesar Mora Sr. of Wenatchee was arrested and booked into CCRJ for Unlawful Possession of a Controlled Substance – Cocaine with Intent to Deliver and Alien in Possession of a Firearm. Also arrested for Alien in Possession of a Firearm was 54 year old Rene Rodriguez-Rodriguez.

Upon completion of the search warrant service on Malaga Alcoa Highway an element of the Chelan County Regional SWAT team was relocated to the 1500 block of Cashmere Street to assist Wenatchee Police Department with the service of the related Search Warrant. Fifty-five year old Jose Valadez of Wenatchee was arrested on existing probable cause for four counts of Delivery of a Controlled Substance.

The Columbia River Drug Task Force works diligently to protect our community from illegal narcotics. We believe cases like this do make a significant impact on our community by removing a large amount of illegal drugs which would have been distributed throughout the community.

The Columbia River Drug Task Force is comprised of Detectives from Chelan County Sheriff’s Office, Wenatchee Police Department, East Wenatchee Police Department, and Washington State Patrol. The Chelan County Sheriff’s Office is the lead agency also supplying a Sergeant and an Analyst.

hwy20 2019

WSDOT Photo

Lower snowpack, favorable weather could speed this year’s SR 20 opening

DIABLO – Forget about that groundhog. A sure sign of spring in the Pacific Northwest is the announcement that the clearing of 37 miles of State Route 20 connecting the Skagit and Methow valleys began yesterday, Monday, March 25.

Washington State Department of Transportation’s west side maintenance crew began clearing the scenic highway from Colonial Creek to the Ross Lake Overlook at Diablo Gate on Monday. From the east side, crews cleared from Early Winters up 7 miles to Silver Star Gate – and kept going.  By mid-morning Tuesday, March 26, crews cleared one lane for an additional 7 miles to Lone Fir (campground). 

The barricades will remain in place at Early Winters because crews will need to remove some trees that pose a danger to travelers before it’s safe to allow people beyond the gate.

The crews expect to meet between Rainy and Washington passes within four to six weeks. The work can take longer if there is late spring snow or move more quickly if warmer temperatures accelerate snowmelt.

Once crews clear the snow, they will make necessary repairs to the highway, including guardrails, signs, stripes and pavement patches. Only then can the gates open to travelers.  The reopening will provide:

  • Another route between western and eastern Washington for travelers.
  • Access to more miles of US Bike Route 10.
  • Access to hiking trailheads and campgrounds.

During an assessment trip on Monday, March 18, WSDOT avalanche and maintenance staff found 6 feet of snow at Rainy and Washington passes; that’s 4 feet less than last year.

Public access between the closure gates is allowed during the winter months but during the Monday through Thursday clearing process, that space is a legal work zone closed to the public due to the heavy equipment used in the clearing.

In spring 2018, crews needed seven weeks to clear the highway. Clearing started on March 26, and the highway reopened on May 11. The latest opening was in 1974 when the highway reopened on June 14. During the winter of 1976 to 1977, there wasn’t enough snow to ever close the highway.

Follow the 2019 reopening effort on the North Cascades Highway webpage, on the WSDOT Flickr account or through the WSDOT North and WSDOT East Twitter pages.

Manson School District Board of Directors announced the 2019 Blue and White Excellence Awards winners at its March 25th board meeting.

Nominations were submitted by staff, students and community members.

Award recipients were: High School teacher Susan Sears was the certificated winner and middle/high school attendance clerk Gabby Lopez was the classified winner.

susan sears Susan Sears HS Career and Technical Education (CTE) Instructor and Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) and Robotics Club Advisor. Her nominator wrote: “Her work and dedication to robotics participants is outstanding. She devotes tons of time and forms solid relationships with her students.”
gabby lopez

Gabby Lopez MS/HS Clerk and Varsity Soccer Coach. His nominee noted “He is a humble person, pleasant and most importantly, he collaborates with whoever asks him for help.”

Both Gabby and Susan will be honored at the next School Board Meeting on April 29th and at the Chelan County Education Awards Banquet on April 23rd.

FFA JOB INT PICTIRE1439

Manson FFA recently competed in the District #7 Employment Skills Leadership Development event.

Members that competed were: Teresa Venegas, Bryce LaMar and Blake Cochran.

In this event students had to complete a job application, cover letter, resume and a thank you note after the completion of a 20-minute job interview.

There was a total of 36 competitors in this year’s event.

ChelanFireRescueLogo200CHELAN FIRE and RESCUE

Long Range Plan

Agenda
03/28/2019 @ 11:00 a.m.

Call to order:
Flag Salute:
Staffing:
Apparatus:
Funding:
Adjournment:

wsdot logoPlan ahead to avoid fines, prevent road damage

OLYMPIA – With a record-setting winter finally in the history books, the arrival of spring means drivers in Washington have until Sunday, March 31, to remove studded tires.

The Washington State Department of Transportation reminds drivers that state law requires all studded tires to be removed by the end of the day March 31. Starting at midnight on Monday, April 1, drivers with studded tires face a $136 fine.

Studded tires also damage pavement, so removing them promptly after winter has passed helps preserve state roadways. Tire removal services can get crowded near the removal deadline, so please plan accordingly.

WSDOT will not extend the studded tire deadline this year, but crews continue to monitor roads, passes, and forecasts and work to quickly clear any late season snow or ice. Travelers are always advised to “know before you go” by checking road conditions before heading out and staying up-to-date on changes by using WSDOT’s social media and email alert tools or calling the 5-1-1 road conditions report.

Washington and Oregon share the same studded tire removal deadline. Other states may have later dates, but the Washington law applies to all drivers in the state, even visitors. No personal exemptions or waivers are issued.

More information about studded tire regulations in Washington is available online.