Chelan Fire and Rescue (CFR) held its Annual Awards Banquet Saturday night (03/16/2019) at Campbell’s Resort on Lake Chelan to honor those members that went the extra mile in 2018. Of the 101 members of Chelan Fire and Rescue, over 80 members and guests attended the function along with special guests, retired Fire Commissioner’s Rick Nedrow and Bob Gervais.

CFR members logged in 8,467 hours of training in 2018.  Thirteen volunteer members logged 50 to 99 hours, 10 members logged 100 to 149 hours, 4 members logged 150 to 199 hours, 5 members logged over 200 with the highest training hours going to FF/EMT Jon Mendoza who logged in 301 hours of training.

CFR responded to 984 emergency 9-1-1 incidents. Total response by members was 2,854 (3,152 hours). The highest response by a volunteer went to to FF/EMT Jon Mendoza who responded to 193 emergency incidents.

Chelan Fire District 7 Volunteer Firefighter’s Association President Dan Crandall recognized Windermere Real Estate Lake Chelan for their on-going support and fund raising in the amount of $7,595.20. FF Judy Johnson was recognized for her serviced as the Associations’ Treasure from 2014 through 2018.

Special Wildfire Certificates of Recognition were presented to 37 members of CFR that responded to one or more of the 53 working wildland fires in 2018. Eight of the wildires were 2nd alarm, ten were 3rd alarm fires and seven State Mobilization responses.

Life Saving Certificates

Administrative Office Manager Carol Kibler was recognized with a Life Saving Certificate after performing the Heimlich maneuver on a choking victim during a vacation in Mexico.

Life Saving Certificates were presented for a Cardiac Arrest victim’s save and recovery to Deputy Fire Chief Mark Donnell, Lt/EMT Shawn Sherman, Lt/EMT Eric Sanderson, FF/EMT Joe Cox, FF/EMT Steven Saugen, FF/EMT Tyee Zacher, FF Judy Johnson and FF James Parks.

Life Saving Certificates were presented for a drowning victim that went into cardiac arrest and was revived to Assistant Fire Chief Brandon Asher, FF/EMT Adam Jones, FF/EMT Troy Keene, FF/EMT Taylor Rains, FF/EMT Joe Cox, SS/EMT Sam Belsky and FF Austin Yancey.

2018 Helping Hands Award went to United States Forest Service and Department of Natural Recourses for their on-going partnership in wildland fire fighting. Tom Allen Construction was also recognized for his company’s support of CFR through in kind services.

Recruit Firefighter of the year 2018 went to FF Sam Belsky.

Station Officers Choice went to FF Steve Garvich-Station 71 (City of Chelan), FF Greg Garvin-Station 72 (Chelan Falls) , FF Jimmy Littlefield-Station 73 (Union Valley) and FF James Belch Station-75 (South Lakeshore).

Support Service Member of the year 2018 went to SS/DO Robert Takagi.

Career Firefighter of the year 2018 was awarded to FF/EMT Taylor Rains.

Volunteer Firefighter of the year 2018 was awarded to FF/EMT Jon Mendoza.

Administrator of the Year 2018 went to Administrative Assistant Faye Barker as she rounds out a 30 year career and gets ready to retire at the end of March 2019.

Career Fire Officer of the year 2018 went to Lt/EMT Evan Woods of C-Shift, Station 71 (City of Chelan).

Volunteer Fire Officer of the year 2018 went to Lt. James Parks, Station 72 (Chelan Falls).

Chief’s Award 2018 went to two Volunteer Fire Officers that have distinguished themselves over the years in how they have ran their stations, motivated their volunteers and ensured a consistent response from their stations, not only to their first due area, but in support of the rest of the district also. Lt. Johnny Synder Station 73 (Union Valley), Lt Hal Jones, Station 75 (South Lakeshore)

Fire Commissioner’s Award 2018 went to Administrative Assistant Faye Barker for a distinguished 30 year career in the Fire Service.

The prestigious Chief’s Company 2018 went to Lt. James Parks, FF/EMT Jon Mendoza, FF/EMT Sammy Rains, FF Sam Belsky, FF Hunter Newmiller and FF Austin Yancey. This group is hand selected by the Chief Officer’s for their merit and skills during emergency operations.

chelan county logoOn March 3, 2019 at approximately 7:05 PM a fire was reported at the Bluebird facility located at 10135 Peshastin Mill Rd. The fire destroyed a 36,000 square foot structure. The structure contained 12 CA rooms, 10 of which contained approximately 250,000 boxes of packed pears. The estimated dollar loss is approximately $9,000,000 for the fruit and approximately $8,000,000 for the structure.

A fire investigation ensued and was a cooperative effort with the Chelan County Department of Fire Prevention and Investigations, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) fire investigation section, the Chelan County Sheriff’s office, and fire investigators representing Travelers Insurance.

Through the process of interviews, eye witness reports and investigation of the fire scene the area of origin has been narrowed down to an area outside of the structure where pallets of cardboard and other combustible material used in the packing of fruit was stored under an awning prior to being used. We identified a light in the area of origin as a possible ignition source; however, we were not able to exclude the possibility that the fire was intentionally set. At this time, the fire is classified as undetermined.

The demolition of the building will occur in the next 2 weeks. The interior of the building will continue to smoke and at times open flames will occur as material continues to consume. The county road will remained closed as the road will be used to transfer material out of the rooms. The North wall continues to be unstable and the public is advised to stay out of the area due to the possibility of collapse outward toward the road.

manson parks logo

Regular Board Meeting
142 Pedoi Street, Bumgarner Building, March 14, 2019, 4:10pm
I. Call to Order
II. Flag Salute
III. Agenda Additions and Deletions
IV. Public Comment
V. Approval of Minutes
a. February 14, 2018 Regular meeting minutes
b. March 6, 2018 Special meeting minutes
VI. Financial Review
a. Review Monthly Financial Report
b. Review and Approve Monthly Voucher
VII. Old Business
a. Leffler Field
i. Executive Session to consider the acquisition of real estate
b. Maintenance vehicle
c. Marina Commercial Contract updates
d. Director’s Report
VIII. New Business
a. Resolution 2019-03 (Surplus of goods)
IX. Adjournment
Next Regular Meeting: April 11, 2019 at 4:10pm, 142 Pedoi Street, Manson, WA 98831

Citizenship Classes English 2019

port cashmere

The Port of Chelan County has entered into a lease agreement for its first tenant at the Port’s Cashmere Mill District Business Park. Hurst International, a Chatsworth, California based fruit label printer and labeling equipment manufacturer, has agreed to lease approximately 6,500 square feet. This recruitment success is expected to bring 10 new jobs and private investment exceeding $1,000,000 to Chelan County.

In response to the news, Port of Chelan County Commission President JC Baldwin stated “Recruiting a manufacturer supporting our agricultural industry as the first tenant in Cashmere is a huge win. I couldn’t be more excited about this news.”

The founder of Hurst International, Ari Lichtenberg, stated “We have had a growing presence in the region with our cutting-edge products and processes. Now is the time to add a manufacturing presence to serve our growing list of customers in Washington State.” Current regional customers include Gebbers Farms, Auvil Fruit, and Chelan Fruit.

Chelan County Commission Chairman Kevin Overbay commented that “Chelan County made a financial contribution from its dedicated economic development sales tax fund to assist the Port in constructing the buildings at the Cashmere Mill District Site. It is great to see an immediate return to the citizens of Chelan County.”

In September 2018, the Port started construction on two general-purpose industrial buildings each containing 16,500 square feet. They are expected to be completed in late spring. “

Cashmere is excited to see Hurst join Louws Truss in providing quality jobs in Cashmere. We look forward to more companies and jobs coming to this location. The Port has not even completed the buildings yet and the first tenant has been secured. I would like to thank the Port Commissioners for their forward looking investment in our community,” said Cashmere Mayor Jim Fletcher.

The Port of Chelan County is governed by three elected Port Commissioners: JC Baldwin, Donn Etherington and Rory Turner.

ChelanFireRescueLogo200Fire Commissioner Russ Jones (Chairperson of the Board of Fire Commissioners) announced that Fire Chief Timothy W. Lemon of Chelan Fire and Rescue has stated his intent to retire 12/31/2019. Chief Lemon has spent the last 10 years, of a 40 year career serving as the Fire Chief of Chelan Fire and Rescue.  

Commissioner Jones expressed his sincere appreciation for Chief Lemon’s experience, expertise, dedication and the professionalism that he brought to Chelan Fire and Rescue. “When you look around the department and community you can see the positive impacts that Chief Lemon has made.” said Jones. Improved response times, better trained and educated personnel, increased the number, type and safety of our fire apparatus, built two new fire stations in the outlying areas, improved WSRB fire classification throughout the district and has had a positive impact on all of the fire departments in Chelan Douglas County through his role as the President of the Chelan Douglas County Fire Chief and Commissioners Association for three years.

Chief Lemon has developed a strong professional and dedicated combination fire department that is appreciated by the community and recognized by the fire service community throughout the state. Under the direction of Chief Lemon, the department has earned numerous State Management of Excellence Awards, and has had CFR personnel recognized at the state level for their achievements. The District has brought in over $2.6 million dollars in grant funds under Chief Lemon’s direction.” I hope we will be able to find someone with his qualities, know-how and willingness to go the extra mile.” said Jones.

The department will start the process to find Chief Lemon’s successor later this year.

wsdot logoOLYMPIA – A unique partnership between the Washington State Department of Transportation, Sound Transit and Washington state-based credit unions will help underserved businesses participating in WSDOT’s Capacity Building Mentorship program with alternative financing options.

The mentorship program has been operating successfully since July 2018; however, access to capital continues to be a primary barrier to small businesses and those owned by minorities, veterans and women. Verity Credit Union, BECU and Harborstone Credit Union are making a total of $750,000 in loans available in support of Washington’s diverse business community. Business Impact NW will administer the loans to firms participating in the mentorship program.

“Washington state continues to lead the nation in support of its underserved entrepreneurs,” said Gov. Jay Inslee. “Ensuring these small businesses have contracting opportunities gives Washington government access to a wider array of business solutions and helps drive innovation. State partnerships with programs such as the Capacity Building Mentorship program supports these initiatives and strengthens our economy.”

“For many small, start-up businesses, getting financing for things such as equipment and other business needs can be a big hurdle, especially for new diverse firms,” said Secretary of Transportation Roger Millar. “We’re pleased that our local credit unions are stepping up to help these protégé businesses as they work to grow their capacity and experience.”

The Capacity Building Mentorship program pairs small, minority-, veteran- and women-owned businesses with successful prime contractors and consultants. These mentors provide technical assistance and business advice to strengthen the protégés’ capacity to work with WSDOT and Sound Transit.  The mentorship program is part of WSDOT’s State Funded Contracts – Diversity Roadmap and one of the highlighted efforts of the Governor’s subcabinet on Business Diversity.

England1272

The Manson School Board recently asked community members for nominations of Manson School District Staff Members who have made a significant contribution to the lives of students and/or the greater Manson community.

Aaron England, owner of England Chiropractic, parent and community member contacted the school district earlier this week and wanted to make a financial contribution to those staff members selected for this award. England Chiropractic will donate $500 to each recipient of the 2019 Blue and White Awards to use in their professional work.

Manson School District would like to thank Aaron for his generous donation and ongoing support of Manson Schools.

Nominations for this award are being accepted until March 18, 2019 at noon. You can submit one classified and one certificated staff member.   Winning nominees will be announced at the Manson School Board meeting on March 25, 2019 at 6:00 p.m.

Nominations forms are available online at the school district website www.manson.org, in both English and Spanish. If you should have any questions, please call the Manson School District office at 687-3140.

Know bowl1280

On Monday, February 25th, Manson’s Knowledge Bowl team battled against a very tough pool of 2B competition at the North Central Washington Regional Knowledge Bowl Tournament held at Wenatchee High School.

The Manson team competed against four other 2B schools: Liberty Bell, Tonasket, Soap Lake, and Brewster. All of the schools were fighting for one of the three spots that would guarantee a berth to the 37th Annual Washington State Knowledge Bowl Tournament on Saturday, March 23rd at West Valley High School in Yakima, Washington.  Last year, Manson missed going to State by one point to Soap Lake.  This year was a different story.  During the oral rounds, they fought hard and easily defeated Brewster, Tonasket, and Soap Lake.  The toughest competition for Manson was the perennial juggernaut and State Contender Liberty Bell. By the end of the night, Manson (65 points) sent a clear message to Soap Lake (54 points) that they were not going away without the win and hardware.  With their drive and determination, Manson clearly took 2nd place. Liberty Bell achieved top honors, finishing the night with a whopping 116 points. 3rd place went to Soap Lake, Tonasket took 4th with 35 points, and Brewster finished the night with a 5th place finish and earned 26 points.

The six members representing Manson High School Knowledge Bowl team at State are: Tyler Charlton (Captain), Jose Pascasio (Co-Captain), Connor Torgesen, Louis Sanchez, Rowan Evig, and Cody Fitzpatrick.

springchick800

When you set your clocks forward for Daylight Saving Time, which is March 11 this year, it is a good time to review the safety checklist.

Smoke Alarms

Smoke AlarmsSmoke alarms save lives – if they are powered by a fresh battery. You should test them every month to make sure they work & replace the battery at least once a year according to the NFPA. If the alarm makes a “chirping” sound, replace it immediately.

Smoke alarms should be located in every bedroom & in the common areas on each floor of a home. Mount them at least 10 feet from the stove to reduce false alarms, less than 12 inches from the ceiling & away from windows, doors & ducts.

Did you know smoke alarms can be interconnected wirelessly? That means, when one sounds, they all sound. A Consumer Product Safety Commission survey found this is the best way to notify everyone in a home if there is a fire.

Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Carbon Monoxide DetectorsCarbon monoxide (CO) is an invisible, odorless gas and it can kill you. Anything in the home that burns fuel can potentially become a source of carbon monoxide. CO alarms should be installed in a central location outside each bedroom and on every level of the home. The safety tips for CO detectors mirror those of smoke alarms: change the batteries, test them and interconnect them, if possible. Also, make sure vents for your gas appliances (fireplace, dryer, stove and furnace) are free and clear of snow or debris.

Family Emergency Plan

Family Emergency PlanThe National Safety Council recommends every family have an emergency plan in place in the event of a natural disaster or other catastrophic event. Spring is a great time to review that plan with family members to make sure they know what to do.

Have a home and car emergency kit. The Federal Emergency Management Agency says an emergency kit should include one gallon per day of water for each person, at least a three-day supply of food, flashlight and batteries, first aid kit, filter mask, plastic sheeting and duct tape, and medicines.

The emergency plan also should include:

  • A communications plan to outline how your family members will contact one another if they are not in the same place and where you should meet if it’s safe to go outside.
  • A shelter-in-place plan if outside air is contaminated; FEMA recommends sealing windows, doors and air vents with plastic sheeting
  • A getaway plan including various routes and destinations in different directions.

CC sheriff logo 2018Sheriff Brian Burnett reports on February 22nd, 2019 the Chelan County Sheriff’s Office School Resource Officer for the Cashmere School District, Deputy Mutch was advised by school staff of an online post threatening the safety of Cashmere High School. The post was made as a comment on someone else’s YouTube channel. It is believed person who posted the comment was 18 year old Gerardo Tovar-Medina of Wenatchee. The comment said “I was planning on shooting up the school”. Mr. Tovar has not attended Cashmere Schools for several years and never attended Cashmere High School.

The online comments alarmed several students and staff. All schools in the Cashmere School District were placed on a “lockout”. After hearing the incident was reported to law enforcement, Mr. Tovar called the school. He was transferred to Deputy Mutch who kept him on the phone while directing Deputies to his residence in Wenatchee. Mr. Tovar was detained and interviewed. He admitted to posting the comment on YouTube but said his intent was only to scare them.

Chelan County Sheriff’s Office Detectives served a search warrant on Mr. Tovar’s residence. Several drawings and notes were located indicating Mr. Tovar had done research on past mass shootings. There was also indications Mr. Tovar was planning or had a desire to commit a mass shooting at Cashmere High School.

Mr. Tovar was booked into CCRJC for Threats to Bomb or Injure Property.

The Chelan County Sheriff’s Office takes threats to the safety seriously. The School Resource Officers throughout the county provide a necessary link to the Sheriff’s Office and provide a quick and reliable contact to address threats rapidly as was done in this incident.

WATSON KEITLYN1253Keitlyn Watson, Principal of Manson Elementary has informed the Manson School Board of her intent to resign at the end of the 2018-19 School Year.

Ms. Watson has recently gotten married (congratulations!) and will be moving to the Bellingham area to live with her new husband. She has served in Manson for three years and made a substantial impact on students and staff.  Ms. Watson shared “she absolutely loves this community and the environment, and will miss everyone greatly.” We are happy for Keitlyn as a friend, mentor and colleague though we are saddened she will be leaving our community. We all wish her the very best of luck in her future endeavors.

Manson School District will be advertising the Manson Elementary Principal position and seeking applicants. In order to hire the very best candidate available we will be interviewing prospective candidates in the last week of March and hope to announce the new principal by mid-April. Our selection process will include opportunities for parents and staff members to be involved in the hiring process. We will send out the specific times and dates for parent participation opportunities in the near future.

 

Carter and Ben District Spe

L-R – Ben Cullison, Carter Lyman

Manson's District Spelling Bee was held Thursday, February 21, 2019 at the Manson Elementary School.

This year 12 students from 4th through 8th grade competed for the District Spelling Bee Champion title. 

The spelling bee lasted 7 rounds.  The final 2 spellers were Carter Lyman and Ben Cullison, both 7th grade students.

The Manson School District Spelling Champion is 7th grader Carter Lyman with the winning word "sachet".   

These finalists will advance on to the NCW Cooperative Spelling Bee in East Wenatchee on March 19, 2019.  

CC sheriff logo 2018Sheriff Brian Burnett reports on February 20th 2019 at approximately 6:55 pm Deputies were dispatched to a disturbance in the 3600 block of Selfs Motel Road in Cashmere.

The caller reported hearing several gunshots, then someone yelling for help. Deputies arrived soon after and were contacted by the original caller. While making this contact the suspected shooter, a 37 year old male who lived in the complex exited his residence. Deputies detained him without incident.

After interviewing witnesses , it was determined the suspect fired several shots into the air from a revolver near the front porch of his residence. A few minutes after the shots were fired, a 25 year old neighbor confronted the suspect. This quickly turned into a physical fight where the 25 year old struck the suspect with a stone bowl injuring him. During the fight, another neighbor tried to break it up and was pushed into a window causing it to break.

The 25 year old male was later booked into CCRJC for Assault second degree.

Deputies with the assistance of a Detective served a search warrant on the suspect’s residence and recovered a stolen firearm.
The 37 year old male was booked into CCRJC for Possessing a Stolen Firearm, Aiming or Discharging a Firearm, and assault 4th degree.

douglascountysheriff148On 2-21-19 at approximately 11:15 am Douglas County emergency responders, DCSO, DCFD 2, and Ballard Ambulance, were dispatched to the 400 block of Parkway Drive, in Rock Island, for a 6 year old female child submerged in Putter’s Lake.

Emergency responders were able to retrieve the child from the pond using a rescue suite.

The child was initially transported to CWH by Ballard ambulance then flown to Children’s Hospital, in Seattle. The child’s current condition is critical.

Investigators believe the child walked onto the pond surface and fell into the open water. Investigators do not believe there is any foul play.

manson parks logo

Manson Parks will begin registration for AAU T-Ball, Softball, and Baseball on March 4th.

Registration ends on March 15th at 6pm.

Registration forms will be distributed through the Manson School District, or they can be found on our website at www.mansonparks.com.

Cost to play is $25 for t-ball and $30 for softball and baseball.

Please call our office with any questions at 509-687-9635.

douglascountysheriff148On 2-19-19 at approximately 5:15 am Douglas County Deputies responded to a report of two adult males stuck at the intersection of Road 5 SW and Road A SW, which is a primitive unplowed road. It was reported the two subjects had been stuck for two days.

With the assistance of Fire District 5 and Fire District 1, the two males were rescued by snowmobile.

One subject was transported to CWH for evaluation.

After rescuing the two males from the vehicle, responders learned a third adult male was on foot attempting to walk out. Responders located and rescued the third person approximately 1.5 miles from the truck.

It is believed none of the involved sustained severe or life threatening injuries.

manson parks logo

Manson Parks will hold a Special Meeting on March 6th at 5:30pm at the Grange in Manson. The purpose of the meeting is to update the community on the Parks’ current activities, including the Leffler Park project. We encourage everyone to come learn about the latest park happenings, and voice their opinions!

Special Board Meeting
Special Board Meeting
Manson Grange Hall, 157 E. Wapato Way, Manson WA
March 6, 2019, 5:30pm
I. Call to Order
II. Flag Salute
III. Current park activities update, followed by public Q & A
IV. Leffler Park project update, followed by public Q & A
V. Adjournment

Next Regular Meeting: March 14, 2019 at 4:10pm, 142 Pedoi Street, Manson, WA 98831

ChelanFireRescueLogo200AGENDA

Chelan Fire and Rescue
Wednesday, February 20, 2019 at 3:00 P.M.
232 East Wapato, Chelan, WA

Proposed Chelan Fire and Rescue agenda pending Board approval.
Flag Salute:
Call to Order:
Approve Agenda:
Public Comment:
Consent Agenda:
* Revenue and Expenditure Report: December 2018 and January 2019
* Payroll: $124,605.18 January 1-31, 2019 Paid: 02-05-2019
* Vouchers for January 2019 General Account: Vouchers #18575 – 18596 for $18,846.97; Vouchers #18597 – 18612 for $21,964.57; Vouchers #18624 – 18634 for $7,337.36.
* Vouchers for January 2019 Capital Account: Vouchers #17088 - 17089 for $5,405.71; Vouchers #17090 for $5,500.00.
* Minutes: January 9 and 30, 2019.
Fire Chief Report:
* 2019 Budget / Emergency Response Report / Facilities/Apparatus/Equipment
◦ Deputy Chief Operations Report: Operations / Fire Prevention / Public Education / Career Staff
◦ Assistance Chief of Volunteer Services: Volunteer Recruitment and Training / Volunteer Staff
Firefighters Association Report:
Unfinished Business:
* Ladder 71 replacement apparatus
* AFG - SCBA
* Rescue Boat
* Hiring Process – Administrative Assistant
New Business:
* Resolution 2019-00 Surplus Fire Apparatus.
* DNR Phase II Grant
* Lake Chelan Emergency Services Submit 03/07/2019, 0900hr to 1100hr.
Special Event:
* 03/16/2019, 1800hr – 2018 awards Banquet, Campbell’s Resort.
* 03/29/2019, 1800hr – Faye Baker’s Retirement Party, Senior Center
Board for Volunteer Firefighters
* Invoices & Accident Report
Commissioner Comments: No action to be taken.
Executive Session:
RCW 42.30.110(1)(g). To evaluate the qualifications of an applicant for public employment or to review the performance of a public employee.
RCW 42.30.110(1)(c) to consider the minimum price at which real estate will be offered for sale or lease when public knowledge regarding such consideration would cause a likelihood of increased or decreased price.
Adjournment:

CC sheriff logo 2018Sheriff Brian Burnett reports that 39-year-old Benjamin Hayden of Woodland, WA was injured this afternoon while snowmobiling near Sugarloaf Lookout approximately 12 miles northeast of Leavenworth.

At approximately 12:45pm Deputy Mike McLeod and USFS Law Enforcement Officer Mike Kujala were on routine snowmobile patrol near Sugarloaf Lookout when they observed a snowmobiler who appeared stuck at the bottom of a steep slope on the east side of the lookout. After making their way down the slope, they contacted Hayden who had suffered a fractured lower leg while attempting to free his snowmobile after it became stuck in the deep snow. Hayden who was by himself had been attempting to free his snowmobile for approximately 2 hours before the officers arrived.

While the officers were stabilizing Hayden’s leg, he went unconscious and became un-responsive. Due to the remote location, a Life Flight Helicopter was requested for Hayden. At approximately 2:30pm, Hayden was transported from the scene by Life Flight to Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee.

The Chelan County Sheriff’s Office would like to remind snowmobilers that they should never ride alone. In this case if the officers would not have been in the area, Hayden may not have been discovered until he was reported overdue.

manson schoolThe Manson School Board is asking our community for nominations of Manson School District Staff Members who have made a significant contribution to the lives of students and/or the greater Manson community. The Manson School Board hopes to receive nominations from parents, students, former students, and community members who have been involved in our schools.

Selection criteria is as follows: one certificated employee (grades P-12) and one support staff employee (secretaries, bus drivers, custodians, para-professionals, food services, coaches, etc.) 

Nominations will be accepted until March 20, 2019 at noon. Winning nominees will be announced at the Manson School Board meeting on March 25, 2019 at 6:00 p.m.

Nominations forms are available online at the school district website www.manson.org, in both English and Spanish. If you should have any questions, please call the Manson School District office at 687-3140.

boyBB2019

The Manson Trojans traveled to the Tri-Cities this past weekend and performed well in two games at Hanford High School.  The first game on Friday the Trojans defeated the higher seeded Walla Walla Valley Academy 67-61 behind the sharp shooting of senior Avery Thompson who lead the team with 31 points. The following afternoon the Trojans battled league champion Oroville tough before falling 52-43.

This weekend the tournament shifts to the north with the CWB hosting teams from District 5 and 6 in Chelan on Friday and Saturday. Manson kicks the weekend off Friday at 3:30pm where they will face Tri-Cities Prep.   If Manson wins on Friday, they will play the winner of Columbia-Burbank and White Swan on Saturday at 12:15pm.  Manson needs to win both to earn spot in the regional round of the State Tournament.  Best of luck and Go Trojans!

ChelanFireRescueLogo200Chelan Fire and Rescue

Wednesday, February 20, 2019 at 3:00 P.M.
232 East Wapato, Chelan, WA

Proposed Chelan Fire and Rescue agenda pending Board approval.
Flag Salute:
Call to Order:
Approve Agenda:
Public Comment:
Consent Agenda:
* Revenue and Expenditure Report: December 2018 and January 2019
* Payroll: $124,605.18 January 1-31, 2019 Paid: 02-05-2019
* Vouchers for January 2019 General Account: Vouchers #18575 – 18596 for $18,846.97; Vouchers #18597 – 18612 for $21,964.57; Vouchers #18624 – 18634 for $7,337.36.
* Vouchers for January 2019 Capital Account: Vouchers #17088 - 17089 for $5,405.71; Vouchers #17090 for $5,500.00.
* Minutes: January 9 and 30, 2019.
Fire Chief Report:
* 2019 Budget / Emergency Response Report / Facilities/Apparatus/Equipment
◦ Deputy Chief Operations Report: Operations / Fire Prevention / Public Education / Career Staff
◦ Assistance Chief of Volunteer Services: Volunteer Recruitment and Training / Volunteer Staff
Firefighters Association Report:
Unfinished Business:
* Ladder 71 replacement apparatus
* AFG - SCBA
* Rescue Boat
* Hiring Process – Administrative Assistant
New Business:
* Resolution 2019-00 Surplus Fire Apparatus.
* DNR Phase II Grant
* Lake Chelan Emergency Services Submit 03/07/2019, 0900hr to 1100hr.
Special Event:
* 03/16/2019, 1800hr – 2018 awards Banquet, Campbell’s Resort.
* 03/29/2019, 1800hr – Faye Baker’s Retirement Party, Senior Center
Board for Volunteer Firefighters
* Invoices & Accident Report
Commissioner Comments: No action to be taken.
Executive Session:
RCW 42.30.110(1)(g). To evaluate the qualifications of an applicant for public employment or to review the performance of a public employee.
RCW 42.30.110(1)(c) to consider the minimum price at which real estate will be offered for sale or lease when public knowledge regarding such consideration would cause a likelihood of increased or decreased price.
Adjournment:

manson parks logo

Regular Board Meeting

142 Pedoi Street, Bumgarner Building, February 14, 2019, 4:10pm
I. Call to Order
II. Flag Salute
III. Election of Officers
IV. Agenda Additions and Deletions
V. Public Comment
VI. Approval of Minutes
a. January 3, 2018 Regular Meeting minutes
VII. Financial Review
a. Review Monthly Financial Report
b. Review and Approve Monthly Voucher
VIII. Old Business
a. Leffler Field
b. Maintenance vehicle
c. Marina Commercial Contract updates
d. Director’s Report
IX. New Business
a. Pacific Engineering services for 2019
b. Resolution 2019-01 (Surplus of goods)
c. Resolution 2019-02 (Wells Fargo credit card closures)
X. Adjournment
Next Regular Meeting: March 14, 2019 at 4:10pm, 142 Pedoi Street, Manson, WA 98831

co2alarmA public service message from your local fire district

Safety Tips

  • Have your home heating systems (including chimneys and vents) inspected and serviced annually by a trained service technician.
  • Never use portable generators inside homes or garages, even if doors and windows are open. Use generators outside only, far away from the home.
  • Never bring a charcoal grill into the house for heating or cooking. Do not barbeque in the garage.
  • Never use a gas range or oven for heating.
  • Open the fireplace damper before lighting a fire and keep it open until the ashes are cool. An open damper may help prevent build-up of poisonous gases inside the home.
  • Install battery-operated CO alarms or CO alarms with battery backup in your home outside separate sleeping areas.
  • Know the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning: headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, sleepiness, and confusion. If you suspect CO poisoning, get outside to fresh air immediately and then call 911.

Know the Symptoms

Because CO is odorless, colorless and otherwise undetectable to the human senses, people may not know that they are being exposed. The initial symptoms of low to moderate CO poisoning are similar to the flu (but without the fever). They include:

  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nausea
  • Dizziness
  • High level CO poisoning results in progressively more severe symptoms, including:
  • Mental confusion
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of muscular coordination
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Ultimately death

Symptom severity is related to both the CO level and the duration of exposure. For slowly developing residential CO problems, occupants and/or physicians can mistake mild to moderate CO poisoning symptoms for the flu, which sometimes results in tragic deaths. For rapidly developing, high level CO exposures (e.g. associated with use of generators in residential spaces), victims can rapidly become mentally confused and can lose muscle control without having first experienced milder symptoms, and they will likely die if not rescued.

(The following is an editorial and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of MVT)

burnett init 800

On December 31, 2018, the start of my third term as Chelan County Sheriff, I swore an oath, “That I will support the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the State of Washington, and will faithfully and impartially perform the duties of the office of sheriff to the best of my ability.”

In October of 2018, I submitted a letter / guest opinion to the Wenatchee World asking for voters to vote no against both I–940 and I–1638. (See attached)

The following statement, which I am in agreement with, was posted on the Washington State Sheriffs Association page on 1/01/19.

Initiative 1639 makes significant changes to the firearm laws of the State of Washington. The Washington State Sheriffs Association publicly opposed Initiative 1639 prior to the election. As the elected Sheriffs of our respective counties, we expressed our concern that the initiative placed greater restrictions on law-abiding citizens while creating unreasonable expectations regarding how such restrictions would be enforced. These concerns continue to exist today.

The initiative is being challenged in court, and concerns a topic about which many of us feel very strongly -- our rights as protected by the Second Amendment. As elected Sheriffs, we are sworn to uphold all rights protected by the Constitution. First and foremost, we are sworn to uphold the Rule of Law and the Constitution. We reaffirm our strong support for the Rule of Law and for the Courts to be the separate but equal branch of our government that interpret that law.

In recognition of this separation of powers we encourage all residents of our state to join us in balancing our opinions and beliefs on this issue with our commitment to our Oath of Office and to the Rule of Law, and ask that you work alongside us to resolve our differences within the framework of the Constitution.

As with many other laws, the application of Initiative 1639 will undoubtedly vary from county to county across the State, based on local priorities and resources available. We will continue to monitor the process as the Courts weigh in on any challenges, and look forward to working with the people of the State of Washington to improve public safety in all of our communities. http://washeriffs.org

As your Chelan County Sheriff, I am committed to serving the citizens in a way that both protects their Constitutional rights while being both fair and impartial while upholding the rule of law.

Respectfully,

Brian Burnett

Chelan County Sheriff

 

Screen Shot 2019 01 28 at 7

The Manson High School Vex Robotics Team attended the CWU League #3 Vex Robotics Tournament at Seattle Preparatory School on January 26-27, 2019.

The students earned 2nd place out of sixteen teams at the competition.

The team also earned the Programming Skills Champion Award for their robot’s autonomous software program. The Educator Award was awarded to their coach, Susan Sears.

The team is comprised of (L-R)- Titus Petersen, Jose Vazquez, Jonathan Sarmiento, Cole Cochran, Zoe Thomas, Cara Hutton, (not pictured) Rowan Evig, Connor and Grant Torgesen.

brandy and cassie

Manson School District is proud to announce that two elementary teachers, Cassandra Williams and Brandy Samson, have earned their National Board Certification for the 2018-19 school year in Early-Middle Childhood Literacy.

Like board-certified doctors and accountants, teachers who achieve National Board Certification have met rigorous standards through intensive study, expert evaluation, self-assessment and peer review. Manson School District now has 11 nationally board certified teachers with several more working towards completion.

Other National Board Certified teachers in are district are: Amy Anderson, Phil Fournier, Jay Fox, Anita Johanson, Steve Nygreen, Susan Sears, Katie Sperling, Heather Teague and Andrea Whitney.

MHS FBLA Winter 2019

Manson High School FBLA attended the North Central Region FBLA Winter Leadership Conference in Wenatchee on January 19, 2019.

Twenty-eight students placed in twenty-one events.

The following students placed at the regional conference and qualified for the Washington State FBLA Leadership Conference in April. Manson FBLA students placed 1st in five separate competitions and lead the region in number of students participating. 

Individuals:

  • Bailey Cameron – Cyber Security 2nd place

  • Bryan Bernardo – Cyber Security 5th place, Networking Concepts 1st place

  • Bryanna Harris – Introduction to Business 3rd place

  • Cara Hutton – Organizational Leadership 6th place

  • Cole Cochran – Securities & Investments 5th place, Spreadsheet Applications 4th place

  • Grant Torgesen- Introduction to Parliamentary Procedure 3rd place, Introduction to Financial Math 2nd place

  • Jose Pascasio – Business Calculations 3rd place, Securities & Investments 2nd place

  • Thea Batch – Introduction to Business Communication 1st place, Introduction to Business Procedure 5th place.

  • Ty Charlton – Advertising 1st place, Political Science 2nd place

  • Yessenia Villasenor – Client Service 6th place

Groups:

  • Brayan Cesar, Cole Cochran, Bryce La Mar, Conner Torgesen – Parlimentary Procedure 5th place

  • Briar Soliday, Trenton Stotko, Victor Calderon – Business Ethics 3rd place

  • Bryan Bernardo, Jose Pascasio, Christian Montes – Graphic Design 2nd place

  • Bryce La Mar, Conner Torgesen, Grant Torgesen – Business Ethics 6th place

  • Christian Montes, Parker Schoenwald, Jonathan Morales – Sports & Entertainment Management 3rd place

  • Cole Beazley, Caden Beazley, Bailey Cameron – Sports & Entertainment Management 1st place

  • Devyn Smith, Mara Vargas, Nadia Verduzco – Website Design 2nd place

  • Megan Clausen, Mara Vargas, Devyn Smith – Business Ethics 5th place

  • Oliver Ellingson, Victor Calderon, and Jake Lodwig – Digital Video Production 2nd place

  • Parker Schoenwald, Bailey Cameron, Caden Beazley – Hospitality Management 2nd place

  • Ty Charlton and Cole Beazley – Hospitality Management 1st place

  • Ty Charlton, Tucker Flowers, Parker Schoenwald – Business Ethics 4th place

Manson Trojan Buddies2019

Some very special guests were in attendance at Manson’s home basketball games on Tuesday, January 22nd.

A total of eight Manson Elementary students participated in the first annual Manson Trojan Buddy program.

Assistant Boys Basketball coach, Steve Nygreen, organized the event and gave elementary students the opportunity to pair up with a high school basketball player.

Prior to the game, Trojan Buddies had the opportunity to spend quality time with high school players and form positive relationships.

During the game, Trojan Buddies cheered on the team from behind the bench and enjoyed a post-game visit to the Trojan locker room to celebrate a victory against Liberty Bell. 

douglascountysheriff148On 01-26-19 at approximately 1219 AM Douglas County Deputies were dispatched to a report of a gunshot victim in the 400 block of Crane Orchard Road.

When Deputies arrived they learned Benjamin Pineda-Castrejon, a 32 year old male, of Bridgeport, sustained two gunshot wounds.

As a result of the initial investigation, Jaime Valdovinos-Sanchez, a 29 year old male, of Brewster, was arrested and booked into Okanogan County Jail for Assault in the first degree.

Benjamin was transported to CWH, and released several hours later with non-life threatening injuries.

There are no public safety concerns at this time. The investigation is ongoing.

WSDTlogo450The past is an unreliable predictor of the future, especially when it comes to transportation. This is an underlying message in Washington’s updated transportation policy plan, WTP 2040 and Beyond. It’s an online, interactive transportation plan – the first of its kind in the nation – and is available at www.WTP2040andBeyond.com.

During the plan’s creation, the Washington State Transportation Commission engaged diverse representatives to ensure recommendations presented a fair and balanced picture of issues and opportunities across the state. The commission presented the plan to Governor Inslee and the Washington State Legislature this week.

WTP 2040 and Beyond extends the state’s planning horizon out to 2040 and shines a light on the challenges and opportunities facing the statewide transportation system, emphasizing: 1) technology and innovation, 2) system resilience, and 3) paying for transportation.

The vision is unchanged: a transportation system supporting safe and reliable mobility for people and goods. Today, what is different, is the degree of influence that technology and innovation are having on the transportation system and the effect those changes are having on what safe and reliable mobility means.

The commission also heard a growing sense of urgency across the state about the vulnerabilities in Washington’s transportation system, which will undermine essential emergency response and long-term recovery efforts after a major disaster. This includes retrofits for earthquakes and other natural disasters.

Another challenge to the state’s transportation vision is lack of funding, not only for system resiliency, but even for the most basic preservation and maintenance functions. This continues to challenge local and state transportation agencies as they work to keep the system that is already in place running safely and efficiently. Old models of paying for transportation aren’t keeping up with current needs, resulting in local taxpayers picking up an ever-larger share of transportation funding responsibilities in an effort to make ends meet.

“When we look around the state, we recognize the hard choices that communities are facing when it comes to paying for transportation,” said Jerry Litt, chair of the seven-member citizen Transportation Commission. “They’re working to make the best use of existing resources and stretch their transportation dollars further, but it’s an expensive system to maintain. Existing revenues don’t cover all the basic needs, much less pay for the retrofits and upgrades that are needed.”

Secretary of Transportation Roger Millar concurs, adding, “Washington’s citizens have invested about $200 billion in transportation system assets, such as highways, bridges, ferries and facilities, yet we’re spending less than half of what we should to preserve and maintain those assets to keep them in a state of good repair. We need to continue working with our communities to establish and deliver a long-term vision for the transportation system that serves people, goods, and services.”

WTP 2040 and Beyond looks at the effect the three cross-cutting topics have on Washington’s six statewide transportation goals of economic vitality, safety, preservation, mobility, environment and health, and stewardship. The plan highlights where progress can be made, even in times of uncertainty, by taking measured steps and emphasizing partnerships and collaboration.

“We appreciate the emphasis in this plan on partnerships and collaboration,” notes Andrea Weckmueller-Behringer, executive director of the Walla Walla Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization and chair of the state’s MPO-RTPO Coordinating Committee. “Now more than ever we need to work together to tackle these transportation issues. Every one of our regions has partnerships already in place that provide a strong foundation for the more refined work that WTP 2040 and Beyond calls for.”

WTP 2040 and Beyond is a policy plan and does not include project-specific funding recommendations. It does highlight four “tough topics” that are bigger than any one agency or jurisdiction can address, and which have statewide implications. Those topics are: 1) improving travel and trade across the Columbia River between Vancouver and Portland; 2) limitations on SeaTac airport passenger capacity; 3) improving long-distance, inter-regional public transportation; and 4) rebuilding and reinforcing the Puget Sound ferry systems, including state and locally operated ferries.

WTP 2040 and Beyond sets the stage for identifying projects, investment strategies, and responsibilities for tackling critical needs statewide. It also is designed to provide guidance so local and state plans can work in concert to keep Washington moving.

knowledgebowl2019

On Wednesday January 9th, Manson High School hosted their annual Knowledge Bowl (KB) Tournament.  “Typically, we have the northern region teams (e.g. Liberty Bell, Chelan, Okanogan, etc.) coming down to participate in the competition, but this year we had a huge turn out from the south too,” said Manson coach Phil Fournier.  With the southern tournament being cancelled last minute at Wahluke High School, there was a convergence of the southern and northern teams onto the Manson campus, a veritable North Central Washington (NCW) Knowledge Bowl Tournament. There were 11 schools and 29 teams, ranging from 4A to 2B battling it out. 

With the strong reputation of the intellectual acumen and friendly competitiveness of the NCW region and teams, the battles were intense and well fought.  Liberty Bell, a perennial favorite at State, took 1st place honors while Moses Lake, another juggernaut in State competition, took 2nd place. Manson took 13th place overall in this highly competitive field. Manson High School captain Ty Charlton enjoyed the competition and organization of the event. “It was bigger than previous years.  It ran smoothly and everyone had a good time.”  In between rounds, the various teams congregated to the student hub to check their results and fill up on some snacks and small conversation while a nice warm fire crackled in the background.

The Manson High School Knowledge Bowl team would like to thank the school district and community for the great success of this tournament: the use of teachers’ classrooms, the technological assistance and equipment, the dedication of our incredible readers and timers, and the gracious donations from Manson Red Apple and Manson Growers.   Coach Fournier added, “It was wonderful having Knowledge Bowl coaches from the various schools share with me about how great the tournament was and also about the amazing commitment of all community and staff members involved in this huge endeavor. It was a blast.”

ChelanFireRescueLogo200Position Announcement: Administrative Assistant

Chelan Fire and Rescue (CFR) headquartered in Chelan, Washington, is currently accepting applications to fill a position of Administrative Assistant. This is an outstanding opportunity to work closely with the front office to provide support for a variety of clerical functions across the District. The ideal candidate will demonstrate the highest standards of personal and professional conduct and be comfortable serving in a confidential position. Candidates can expect to work in an environment that is dynamic and service oriented. It is essential for the candidate to be highly skilled in administering and performing a variety of clerical and computer tasks. Excellent verbal and written skills, a high level of attention to detail, and the ability to properly administer District policies and be highly customer service orientated.

At time of hire, must possess and maintain a valid Washington State driver’s license AND have passed a complete background investigation, driving record check, employment history verification, and reference confirmation.

Salary and Benefits

The annual salary range is between $37,368 and $41,520 DOE. In addition, there is an extensive benefit package that includes medical, dental, vision benefits as well as participation in the PERS Retirement Plan.

Application Packet

The following application packet is DUE no later than 5:00 PM on Friday, February 1, 2019.

  • · Complete application from CFR website. (chelan7.com/operations/employment-volunteer/)
  • · Resume. (three-page maximum including cover letter)
  • · Personal and Professional References.
  • · Answers to the following essay questions. (no more than 1 page each)
  1. What is your experience working in a clerical position?
  2. What is your experience working with a Fire/EMS organization and/or the public sector?
  3. What are your current roles in the local community?

Selected candidates will move to the next stage of the process that may include a panel interview, skill testing and/or a Fire Chief Interview. The application packet may be hand delivered, mailed, or sent by private carrier (i.e., FEDEX, UPS, etc.). Please address your packet to: Chelan Fire and Rescue, Attn: Carol Kibler, 232 East Wapato Ave. / PO Box 1317 Chelan WA 98816. CHELAN FIRE AND RESCUE 232 East Wapato / PO Box 1317 Chelan, WA 98816 509.682.4476 / chelan7.com

Position Details

Description of District:

Located in Chelan, Washington, Chelan Fire and Rescue’s jurisdiction is located in Northeast Chelan County, covering 125 square miles around Lake Chelan and surrounding areas. With population of 3,500 in City Limits and 2,961 outside city of Chelan. A budget of $3.2 million currently allows 7 career, 65 volunteers and 6 administrative/support members to offer a full range of emergency services. These services include fire suppression, public education, technical rescue, hazardous materials, wildland–interface suppression, and full emergency medical services for basic life support responses. CFR provides emergency response services from 5 fire stations, one station staffed with 2 career 24/7. An administrative facility is located at our headquarters station 71 and serves as the district’s administrative office. On average, there are over 950 annual calls for service.

Qualifications/Requirements for the successful applicant include:

  • · Must hold or be able to obtain a valid Washington driver's license.
  • · Must pass a thorough background investigation.
  • · Must be bondable and insurable.
  • · Must be 18 and a high school or (GED) graduate
  • · Desirable AA degree or two (2) years of experience in a clerical setting. A BA is preferred.

The applicant must have demonstrated experience, skills, and characteristics, which include:

  • · High level of experience and enthusiasm to support the clerical functions of CFR District.
  • · High level of professionalism, work ethic and trustworthiness to be assigned confidential work.
  • · Ability to build and maintain effective working and interpersonal relationships with the community, District personnel, other public safety and political entities, and superiors.
  • · Ability to support vision, goals, and objectives in accordance with department policy.
  • · Demonstrated skills in clerical roles including being proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook and Publisher.
  • · Ability to function independently when assigned work by supervisor or chief officers.
  • · Ability to trouble-shoot, problem-solve and identify issues as they arise.

Physical Requirements and Working Conditions:

  • · The physical demands and work environment described here are representative of those that must be met by an employee to successfully perform the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.
  • · There is a current job description in effect for this position.
  • · Work days and hours; Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 40 hour work week with exception to overtime as approved.
  • · Work is generally performed in an office environment, but may also require driving to other District facilities. Attending to issues that arise will occasionally require a flexible and varied schedule.
  • · The ability to drive, lift 25 pounds, crawl under desk workstations, work in and around fire apparatus or

CHELAN FIRE AND RESCUE 232 East Wapato / PO Box 1317 Chelan, WA 98816 509.682.4476 / chelan7.com

sit or stand for extended periods of time is required.

  • · Work involves walking, talking, hearing, using hands to handle, feel, or operate objects, and reach with hands and arms. Vision abilities required by this job include close vision, distance vision, peripheral vision, depth perception, and the ability to adjust focus.
  • · The noise level in the work environment is usually moderately quiet while in the office, but may vary greatly at other District facilities.

The application packet, must be received in its entirety no later than 5:00 PM on Friday, February 1, 2019. It may be hand delivered, mailed, or sent by private carrier (i.e., FEDEX, UPS, etc.). Please address your packet to:

Chelan Fire and Rescue

232 East Wapato / PO Box 1317

Chelan WA 98816

Tentative Hiring Schedule: Application

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Application Closing

Friday, February 1, 2019

Testing Process

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Interview – Oral Board

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Chief and Admin Office Manager Interview

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Conditional Offer

Monday, March 4, 2019

Anticipated first day of employment with CFR

Monday, March 18, 2019

WSDTlogo450OLYMPIA – Several transportation organizations representing cities, counties, ports, and transit will discuss their priorities for the 2019 legislative session with the Transportation Commission at its meeting next week in Olympia. Other meeting highlights include a briefing on two proposed toll projects on interstates in the Portland area, plans for an upcoming review of ferry fares, and a presentation from a company that helps communities understand travel behavior and patterns by using diverse data sets.

The meeting starts at 9 a.m. both Wednesday, Jan. 23, and Thursday, Jan. 24, at the Transportation Building, 310 Maple Park Ave. SE, on the Capitol Campus in Olympia. This meeting is open to the public and persons wishing to speak to the commission may do so during several public comment periods throughout the meeting (see agenda for detail).

Wednesday’s meeting begins with a legislative preview from cities, counties, ports, and transit organizations. The Washington State Department of Transportation will follow this briefing with a presentation on the agency’s legislative and budget priorities. The commission is tasked with providing transportation policy recommendations to the Legislature and Governor, and these briefings keep the commission apprised of emerging priorities for all levels of government with transportation responsibilities.

Also on Wednesday, the commission and Washington State Ferries staff will provide an overview of a proposed ferry fare-adjustment process that will begin this spring. This process includes working with ferry-served communities to help inform the commission’s fare-setting decision making that will occur in July 2019, setting fares for the next two years (2019-2021).   The commission will consider a new approach this year that will seek input from ferry riders and communities earlier in the fare-setting process, before a fare proposal is released.

On Wednesday afternoon, the commission will learn about the Oregon Transportation Commission’s request to the Federal Highway Administration to allow tolling on portions of Interstate 5 and Interstate 205 in the Portland area. The Oregon Department of Transportation will provide a briefing of the process, the tolling options reviewed, what it is proposing, and the next steps. Washington’s commission is interested in learning more about Oregon’s approach to tolling and its potential effect on Washington’s commuters and businesses.

Following this briefing, WSDOT will report on the financial plan for the State Route 520 bridge and report on the first three-years of Interstate 405 express toll lane operations. WSDOT also will brief the commission on the status of completing the express toll lane system on I-405 from Bellevue south to Renton, and the existing State Route 167 high occupancy toll lanes.

Wednesday’s meeting concludes with a report on the results of the summer 2018 survey of the Ferry Riders’ Opinion Group survey panel. Along with on-board interviews, the survey evaluated the performance of the ferry system during the summer months and assessed the attitudes of summer ferry riders, including those who ride for recreational purposes.

On Thursday, UrbanLogiq will brief the commission on how analysis of big data from multiple sources can help communities understand travel behavior and trends. This tool can help cities better manage traffic and improve transportation planning. The commission also will hear about the 2019 legislative and policy initiatives of three state agencies that provide transportation grants to improve mobility in cities, counties, and for freight movement.

For more information about the commission and a complete meeting agenda, visit: www.wstc.wa.gov/

CC sheriff logo 2018Sheriff Brian Burnett reports on January 14th, 2019 Shawn Lewis, a 48 year old Entiat man was located deceased north of Entiat. He was found by a friend at the base of a ledge near milepost 221 on highway 97A.

Mr. Lewis had not been seen by family or friends since Friday, January 11th. His vehicle was located in a gravel area on the side of highway 97A during the evening of Sunday the 13th. Deputies responded to the area and did not locate Mr. Lewis. Family had already removed the vehicle and there was nothing to indicate he was still in the area. On Monday, Mr. Lewis’ friend went to the location and started hiking the hillside. He located Mr. Lewis at the bottom of a rock ledge several hundred yards from the roadway and reported it to the Sheriff’s Office.

Deputies and detectives responded to the location and found Mr. Lewis deceased with injuries consistent with a fall. It is unknown how Mr. Lewis fell but the hillside had snow and ice on it. It appeared Mr. Lewis had been there since at least the previous day.

pangborne logo 200A record number of Airline passengers flew out of Pangborn Memorial Airport in 2018. Passenger enplanements totaled 64,689 which represents a 7.2% increase over 2017. Passengers flying into the greater Wenatchee Valley totaled 62,874 a 7.1% increase from 2017. Total passenger volume of 127,563 is a record for the Airport.

Due to passenger growth in 2017, Alaska Air added additional flights during the summer and holidays in 2018. “Alaska continues to be a strong partner, adding more flights at busy travel times supporting local residents and businesses”, said Chelan County Port Commission President JC Baldwin.

The other major factor in the record passenger numbers was a significant reduction in cancellations in 2018. The percentage of cancelled flights fell from 5.9% in 2017 to 2.7% in 2018.

“As our community seeks more air service, they continued to use the expanded Seattle service, which is the best way to get more flights to more destinations in the future”, said Douglas County Port Commission President Jim Huffman.

2018 also marked important progress in the communities’ goal of securing additional air service. This past summer the Airport was awarded a $750,000 Federal grant to secure non-stop regional jet service between Pangborn Airport and the San Francisco Bay Area. This grant was matched by over $400,000 in local pledges.

The Airport has held meetings with several interested airlines with the goal of obtaining new service by mid-2020.

The Airport is jointly owned by the Ports of Chelan and Douglas Counties.

1821 ADA Ramp Plan A 180719

The Manson School District applied for and received an urgent repair grant from the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction in the amount of $110,097 to construct a wheel chair ramp at the elementary school. Eric Sivertson, Operations Manager submitted our application in the fall and was notified in early December that we were selected as one of the award recipients.

Construction on the ramp will begin in July of 2019 and should be completed by August of 2019. The ramp improves Manson Elementary ADA access allowing for both an interior (elevator) and exterior route to all portions of the building and grounds.

manson schoolManson School District

Replacement Educational Programs and Operation Levy

Placed on February 12, 2019 Ballot

The Manson School Board has passed a resolution placing a levy proposition on the February 12th 2019 Chelan County special election ballot. If approved, the levy would replace an expiring Maintenance and Operations (M & O) Levy passed by voters in February 2017.

The proposed levy is for 2 years 2020 & 2021 (Manson has historically run 2-year levies).

The current voter approved amount scheduled to be collected this year (2019) is $1,367,278. The tax rate is $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value.

The proposed amounts are: 2020 $1,449,314 ($1.50 per $1,000) 2021 $1,536,273 ($1.50 per $1,000)

Manson’s EP & O levy funding is approximately 13% of the district’s total funding and either fully or partially supports:

  • Maintenance of school facilities, including custodial staff, equipment, supplies and utilities

  • Instructional programs/staff/technology:

    • College courses in the high school

    • Preschool for all 4 year olds

    • High school internship program

    • Support of the arts (music, drama, art)

    • Special Education (in addition to state/federal funding)

    • Vocational classes (shop, ag classes, business, technology, drones)

    • Technology support

    • Replacement of computers/devices

  • Beyond the School Day Programs

    • After school enrichment and academic intervention classes

    • Middle/High school athletics (coaches, referees, travel, uniforms, equipment)

    • Clubs (pep band, FBLA, FFA, Knowledge Bowl, robotics).

  • Food service program (fresh fruit/vegetable snacks)

  • Professional development/staff training

An informational meeting for the public will be held at Manson High School on February 4th at 6:30PM and additional informational meetings can be scheduled (687-3140). Information is also available on the district website at www.manson.org including an individual tax calculator where taxpayers can determine their estimated local school tax using their property assessed value amounts.


 

Manson School District

Replacement Capital Projects Levy

Placed on February 12, 2019 Ballot

The Manson School Board has passed a resolution placing a six-year capital projects levy on the February 12, 2019 ballot. This proposition would replace an expiring capital levy passed by voters in 2013 set to expire on December 31, 2019.

What would this capital projects levy do?

A committee of Manson community and staff members prioritized the following needs:

  1. Safety Improvements

    1. Redesigning and strengthening entrances to both schools

    2. Replacing doors, adding security cameras

    3. Replace aging fire suppression panels in each building

    4. Replace alarm/security panels

  2. Early Childhood Center

    1. Create a facility designed specifically for 3 & 4 year old children

    2. Free-up classroom space in the elementary

      1. Addresses need for small group spaces

  3. Redesign Elementary Parking/Traffic Area

    1. Expand parking for parents/visitors and staff

    2. Improve parent drop-off/pick-up location

    3. Relocate bus drop-off/pick-up location

  4. Replace Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems

    1. Majority of systems were installed in 1997-98 remodel – twenty-year life span is ending

  5. Remodel MS/HS student bathrooms

  6. Remodel MS/HS gymnasiums

    1. Replace aging wooden bleachers in MS(old) gym

  7. Replace fixtures in both buildings

    1. Plumbing, lighting and kitchen appliances

  8. Track resurfacing

    1. Proactively set aside funds to resurface when it becomes necessary

  9. Continue to invest in student technology/equipment

How much will this cost?

Fixed amount of dollars collected each year (this amount doesn’t fluctuate with assessed value changes)

$499,000 each year 2020-2025 (Previous capital levy amount was $595,000 each year (2014-2019)

Rates per $1000 of assessed property value

  • 2017 $0.72

  • 2018 $0.65

  • 2019 (current) $0.61

  • 2020 (proposed) $0.49

2019 Community Chili Feed a

douglascountysheriff148On 01/05/19 at approximately 9:55 pm, a Douglas County Deputy was on patrol following a vehicle (Mercedes Benz, 350) in the 5000 block of Rock Island Rd. The Deputy ran a registration check on the vehicle and learned it was a stolen vehicle out of Wenatchee. The Deputy initiated a traffic stop in the 1500 block of Ohio Street. The driver initially followed commands but then sped away. The deputy gave chase.

The driver of the stolen vehicle continued to try escape running stop signs and speeding at a high rate of speed. The pursuit went into Rock Island and then onto SR28 back towards East Wenatchee. After several, more turns, the vehicle was westbound on Grant Road approaching the East Wenatchee City limits at about 100 mph. The Deputy in the lead of the pursuit saw other vehicles and determined it was unsafe to continue the pursuit into the City limits. He discontinued pursuing the vehicle and notified dispatch and all other units in the area.

East Wenatchee Officers saw the vehicle as it entered the city limits and gave chase for a short time until the driver fled on foot. The driver was caught shortly thereafter. The driver was identified as Jesus Morales-Lozano a 26-year-old male out of East Wenatchee. Douglas County Deputies booked Jesus into CCRJ for possession of a stolen vehicle, attempting to elude a police vehicle, driving while license suspended in the third degree. Jesus also had an outstanding arrest warrant for driving while suspended in the third degree.