douglascountysheriff148On 01-26-19 at approximately 1219 AM Douglas County Deputies were dispatched to a report of a gunshot victim in the 400 block of Crane Orchard Road.

When Deputies arrived they learned Benjamin Pineda-Castrejon, a 32 year old male, of Bridgeport, sustained two gunshot wounds.

As a result of the initial investigation, Jaime Valdovinos-Sanchez, a 29 year old male, of Brewster, was arrested and booked into Okanogan County Jail for Assault in the first degree.

Benjamin was transported to CWH, and released several hours later with non-life threatening injuries.

There are no public safety concerns at this time. The investigation is ongoing.

WSDTlogo450The past is an unreliable predictor of the future, especially when it comes to transportation. This is an underlying message in Washington’s updated transportation policy plan, WTP 2040 and Beyond. It’s an online, interactive transportation plan – the first of its kind in the nation – and is available at www.WTP2040andBeyond.com.

During the plan’s creation, the Washington State Transportation Commission engaged diverse representatives to ensure recommendations presented a fair and balanced picture of issues and opportunities across the state. The commission presented the plan to Governor Inslee and the Washington State Legislature this week.

WTP 2040 and Beyond extends the state’s planning horizon out to 2040 and shines a light on the challenges and opportunities facing the statewide transportation system, emphasizing: 1) technology and innovation, 2) system resilience, and 3) paying for transportation.

The vision is unchanged: a transportation system supporting safe and reliable mobility for people and goods. Today, what is different, is the degree of influence that technology and innovation are having on the transportation system and the effect those changes are having on what safe and reliable mobility means.

The commission also heard a growing sense of urgency across the state about the vulnerabilities in Washington’s transportation system, which will undermine essential emergency response and long-term recovery efforts after a major disaster. This includes retrofits for earthquakes and other natural disasters.

Another challenge to the state’s transportation vision is lack of funding, not only for system resiliency, but even for the most basic preservation and maintenance functions. This continues to challenge local and state transportation agencies as they work to keep the system that is already in place running safely and efficiently. Old models of paying for transportation aren’t keeping up with current needs, resulting in local taxpayers picking up an ever-larger share of transportation funding responsibilities in an effort to make ends meet.

“When we look around the state, we recognize the hard choices that communities are facing when it comes to paying for transportation,” said Jerry Litt, chair of the seven-member citizen Transportation Commission. “They’re working to make the best use of existing resources and stretch their transportation dollars further, but it’s an expensive system to maintain. Existing revenues don’t cover all the basic needs, much less pay for the retrofits and upgrades that are needed.”

Secretary of Transportation Roger Millar concurs, adding, “Washington’s citizens have invested about $200 billion in transportation system assets, such as highways, bridges, ferries and facilities, yet we’re spending less than half of what we should to preserve and maintain those assets to keep them in a state of good repair. We need to continue working with our communities to establish and deliver a long-term vision for the transportation system that serves people, goods, and services.”

WTP 2040 and Beyond looks at the effect the three cross-cutting topics have on Washington’s six statewide transportation goals of economic vitality, safety, preservation, mobility, environment and health, and stewardship. The plan highlights where progress can be made, even in times of uncertainty, by taking measured steps and emphasizing partnerships and collaboration.

“We appreciate the emphasis in this plan on partnerships and collaboration,” notes Andrea Weckmueller-Behringer, executive director of the Walla Walla Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization and chair of the state’s MPO-RTPO Coordinating Committee. “Now more than ever we need to work together to tackle these transportation issues. Every one of our regions has partnerships already in place that provide a strong foundation for the more refined work that WTP 2040 and Beyond calls for.”

WTP 2040 and Beyond is a policy plan and does not include project-specific funding recommendations. It does highlight four “tough topics” that are bigger than any one agency or jurisdiction can address, and which have statewide implications. Those topics are: 1) improving travel and trade across the Columbia River between Vancouver and Portland; 2) limitations on SeaTac airport passenger capacity; 3) improving long-distance, inter-regional public transportation; and 4) rebuilding and reinforcing the Puget Sound ferry systems, including state and locally operated ferries.

WTP 2040 and Beyond sets the stage for identifying projects, investment strategies, and responsibilities for tackling critical needs statewide. It also is designed to provide guidance so local and state plans can work in concert to keep Washington moving.

knowledgebowl2019

On Wednesday January 9th, Manson High School hosted their annual Knowledge Bowl (KB) Tournament.  “Typically, we have the northern region teams (e.g. Liberty Bell, Chelan, Okanogan, etc.) coming down to participate in the competition, but this year we had a huge turn out from the south too,” said Manson coach Phil Fournier.  With the southern tournament being cancelled last minute at Wahluke High School, there was a convergence of the southern and northern teams onto the Manson campus, a veritable North Central Washington (NCW) Knowledge Bowl Tournament. There were 11 schools and 29 teams, ranging from 4A to 2B battling it out. 

With the strong reputation of the intellectual acumen and friendly competitiveness of the NCW region and teams, the battles were intense and well fought.  Liberty Bell, a perennial favorite at State, took 1st place honors while Moses Lake, another juggernaut in State competition, took 2nd place. Manson took 13th place overall in this highly competitive field. Manson High School captain Ty Charlton enjoyed the competition and organization of the event. “It was bigger than previous years.  It ran smoothly and everyone had a good time.”  In between rounds, the various teams congregated to the student hub to check their results and fill up on some snacks and small conversation while a nice warm fire crackled in the background.

The Manson High School Knowledge Bowl team would like to thank the school district and community for the great success of this tournament: the use of teachers’ classrooms, the technological assistance and equipment, the dedication of our incredible readers and timers, and the gracious donations from Manson Red Apple and Manson Growers.   Coach Fournier added, “It was wonderful having Knowledge Bowl coaches from the various schools share with me about how great the tournament was and also about the amazing commitment of all community and staff members involved in this huge endeavor. It was a blast.”

ChelanFireRescueLogo200Position Announcement: Administrative Assistant

Chelan Fire and Rescue (CFR) headquartered in Chelan, Washington, is currently accepting applications to fill a position of Administrative Assistant. This is an outstanding opportunity to work closely with the front office to provide support for a variety of clerical functions across the District. The ideal candidate will demonstrate the highest standards of personal and professional conduct and be comfortable serving in a confidential position. Candidates can expect to work in an environment that is dynamic and service oriented. It is essential for the candidate to be highly skilled in administering and performing a variety of clerical and computer tasks. Excellent verbal and written skills, a high level of attention to detail, and the ability to properly administer District policies and be highly customer service orientated.

At time of hire, must possess and maintain a valid Washington State driver’s license AND have passed a complete background investigation, driving record check, employment history verification, and reference confirmation.

Salary and Benefits

The annual salary range is between $37,368 and $41,520 DOE. In addition, there is an extensive benefit package that includes medical, dental, vision benefits as well as participation in the PERS Retirement Plan.

Application Packet

The following application packet is DUE no later than 5:00 PM on Friday, February 1, 2019.

  • · Complete application from CFR website. (chelan7.com/operations/employment-volunteer/)
  • · Resume. (three-page maximum including cover letter)
  • · Personal and Professional References.
  • · Answers to the following essay questions. (no more than 1 page each)
  1. What is your experience working in a clerical position?
  2. What is your experience working with a Fire/EMS organization and/or the public sector?
  3. What are your current roles in the local community?

Selected candidates will move to the next stage of the process that may include a panel interview, skill testing and/or a Fire Chief Interview. The application packet may be hand delivered, mailed, or sent by private carrier (i.e., FEDEX, UPS, etc.). Please address your packet to: Chelan Fire and Rescue, Attn: Carol Kibler, 232 East Wapato Ave. / PO Box 1317 Chelan WA 98816. CHELAN FIRE AND RESCUE 232 East Wapato / PO Box 1317 Chelan, WA 98816 509.682.4476 / chelan7.com

Position Details

Description of District:

Located in Chelan, Washington, Chelan Fire and Rescue’s jurisdiction is located in Northeast Chelan County, covering 125 square miles around Lake Chelan and surrounding areas. With population of 3,500 in City Limits and 2,961 outside city of Chelan. A budget of $3.2 million currently allows 7 career, 65 volunteers and 6 administrative/support members to offer a full range of emergency services. These services include fire suppression, public education, technical rescue, hazardous materials, wildland–interface suppression, and full emergency medical services for basic life support responses. CFR provides emergency response services from 5 fire stations, one station staffed with 2 career 24/7. An administrative facility is located at our headquarters station 71 and serves as the district’s administrative office. On average, there are over 950 annual calls for service.

Qualifications/Requirements for the successful applicant include:

  • · Must hold or be able to obtain a valid Washington driver's license.
  • · Must pass a thorough background investigation.
  • · Must be bondable and insurable.
  • · Must be 18 and a high school or (GED) graduate
  • · Desirable AA degree or two (2) years of experience in a clerical setting. A BA is preferred.

The applicant must have demonstrated experience, skills, and characteristics, which include:

  • · High level of experience and enthusiasm to support the clerical functions of CFR District.
  • · High level of professionalism, work ethic and trustworthiness to be assigned confidential work.
  • · Ability to build and maintain effective working and interpersonal relationships with the community, District personnel, other public safety and political entities, and superiors.
  • · Ability to support vision, goals, and objectives in accordance with department policy.
  • · Demonstrated skills in clerical roles including being proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook and Publisher.
  • · Ability to function independently when assigned work by supervisor or chief officers.
  • · Ability to trouble-shoot, problem-solve and identify issues as they arise.

Physical Requirements and Working Conditions:

  • · The physical demands and work environment described here are representative of those that must be met by an employee to successfully perform the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions.
  • · There is a current job description in effect for this position.
  • · Work days and hours; Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 40 hour work week with exception to overtime as approved.
  • · Work is generally performed in an office environment, but may also require driving to other District facilities. Attending to issues that arise will occasionally require a flexible and varied schedule.
  • · The ability to drive, lift 25 pounds, crawl under desk workstations, work in and around fire apparatus or

CHELAN FIRE AND RESCUE 232 East Wapato / PO Box 1317 Chelan, WA 98816 509.682.4476 / chelan7.com

sit or stand for extended periods of time is required.

  • · Work involves walking, talking, hearing, using hands to handle, feel, or operate objects, and reach with hands and arms. Vision abilities required by this job include close vision, distance vision, peripheral vision, depth perception, and the ability to adjust focus.
  • · The noise level in the work environment is usually moderately quiet while in the office, but may vary greatly at other District facilities.

The application packet, must be received in its entirety no later than 5:00 PM on Friday, February 1, 2019. It may be hand delivered, mailed, or sent by private carrier (i.e., FEDEX, UPS, etc.). Please address your packet to:

Chelan Fire and Rescue

232 East Wapato / PO Box 1317

Chelan WA 98816

Tentative Hiring Schedule: Application

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Application Closing

Friday, February 1, 2019

Testing Process

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Interview – Oral Board

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Chief and Admin Office Manager Interview

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Conditional Offer

Monday, March 4, 2019

Anticipated first day of employment with CFR

Monday, March 18, 2019

WSDTlogo450OLYMPIA – Several transportation organizations representing cities, counties, ports, and transit will discuss their priorities for the 2019 legislative session with the Transportation Commission at its meeting next week in Olympia. Other meeting highlights include a briefing on two proposed toll projects on interstates in the Portland area, plans for an upcoming review of ferry fares, and a presentation from a company that helps communities understand travel behavior and patterns by using diverse data sets.

The meeting starts at 9 a.m. both Wednesday, Jan. 23, and Thursday, Jan. 24, at the Transportation Building, 310 Maple Park Ave. SE, on the Capitol Campus in Olympia. This meeting is open to the public and persons wishing to speak to the commission may do so during several public comment periods throughout the meeting (see agenda for detail).

Wednesday’s meeting begins with a legislative preview from cities, counties, ports, and transit organizations. The Washington State Department of Transportation will follow this briefing with a presentation on the agency’s legislative and budget priorities. The commission is tasked with providing transportation policy recommendations to the Legislature and Governor, and these briefings keep the commission apprised of emerging priorities for all levels of government with transportation responsibilities.

Also on Wednesday, the commission and Washington State Ferries staff will provide an overview of a proposed ferry fare-adjustment process that will begin this spring. This process includes working with ferry-served communities to help inform the commission’s fare-setting decision making that will occur in July 2019, setting fares for the next two years (2019-2021).   The commission will consider a new approach this year that will seek input from ferry riders and communities earlier in the fare-setting process, before a fare proposal is released.

On Wednesday afternoon, the commission will learn about the Oregon Transportation Commission’s request to the Federal Highway Administration to allow tolling on portions of Interstate 5 and Interstate 205 in the Portland area. The Oregon Department of Transportation will provide a briefing of the process, the tolling options reviewed, what it is proposing, and the next steps. Washington’s commission is interested in learning more about Oregon’s approach to tolling and its potential effect on Washington’s commuters and businesses.

Following this briefing, WSDOT will report on the financial plan for the State Route 520 bridge and report on the first three-years of Interstate 405 express toll lane operations. WSDOT also will brief the commission on the status of completing the express toll lane system on I-405 from Bellevue south to Renton, and the existing State Route 167 high occupancy toll lanes.

Wednesday’s meeting concludes with a report on the results of the summer 2018 survey of the Ferry Riders’ Opinion Group survey panel. Along with on-board interviews, the survey evaluated the performance of the ferry system during the summer months and assessed the attitudes of summer ferry riders, including those who ride for recreational purposes.

On Thursday, UrbanLogiq will brief the commission on how analysis of big data from multiple sources can help communities understand travel behavior and trends. This tool can help cities better manage traffic and improve transportation planning. The commission also will hear about the 2019 legislative and policy initiatives of three state agencies that provide transportation grants to improve mobility in cities, counties, and for freight movement.

For more information about the commission and a complete meeting agenda, visit: www.wstc.wa.gov/

CC sheriff logo 2018Sheriff Brian Burnett reports on January 14th, 2019 Shawn Lewis, a 48 year old Entiat man was located deceased north of Entiat. He was found by a friend at the base of a ledge near milepost 221 on highway 97A.

Mr. Lewis had not been seen by family or friends since Friday, January 11th. His vehicle was located in a gravel area on the side of highway 97A during the evening of Sunday the 13th. Deputies responded to the area and did not locate Mr. Lewis. Family had already removed the vehicle and there was nothing to indicate he was still in the area. On Monday, Mr. Lewis’ friend went to the location and started hiking the hillside. He located Mr. Lewis at the bottom of a rock ledge several hundred yards from the roadway and reported it to the Sheriff’s Office.

Deputies and detectives responded to the location and found Mr. Lewis deceased with injuries consistent with a fall. It is unknown how Mr. Lewis fell but the hillside had snow and ice on it. It appeared Mr. Lewis had been there since at least the previous day.

pangborne logo 200A record number of Airline passengers flew out of Pangborn Memorial Airport in 2018. Passenger enplanements totaled 64,689 which represents a 7.2% increase over 2017. Passengers flying into the greater Wenatchee Valley totaled 62,874 a 7.1% increase from 2017. Total passenger volume of 127,563 is a record for the Airport.

Due to passenger growth in 2017, Alaska Air added additional flights during the summer and holidays in 2018. “Alaska continues to be a strong partner, adding more flights at busy travel times supporting local residents and businesses”, said Chelan County Port Commission President JC Baldwin.

The other major factor in the record passenger numbers was a significant reduction in cancellations in 2018. The percentage of cancelled flights fell from 5.9% in 2017 to 2.7% in 2018.

“As our community seeks more air service, they continued to use the expanded Seattle service, which is the best way to get more flights to more destinations in the future”, said Douglas County Port Commission President Jim Huffman.

2018 also marked important progress in the communities’ goal of securing additional air service. This past summer the Airport was awarded a $750,000 Federal grant to secure non-stop regional jet service between Pangborn Airport and the San Francisco Bay Area. This grant was matched by over $400,000 in local pledges.

The Airport has held meetings with several interested airlines with the goal of obtaining new service by mid-2020.

The Airport is jointly owned by the Ports of Chelan and Douglas Counties.

1821 ADA Ramp Plan A 180719

The Manson School District applied for and received an urgent repair grant from the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction in the amount of $110,097 to construct a wheel chair ramp at the elementary school. Eric Sivertson, Operations Manager submitted our application in the fall and was notified in early December that we were selected as one of the award recipients.

Construction on the ramp will begin in July of 2019 and should be completed by August of 2019. The ramp improves Manson Elementary ADA access allowing for both an interior (elevator) and exterior route to all portions of the building and grounds.

manson schoolManson School District

Replacement Educational Programs and Operation Levy

Placed on February 12, 2019 Ballot

The Manson School Board has passed a resolution placing a levy proposition on the February 12th 2019 Chelan County special election ballot. If approved, the levy would replace an expiring Maintenance and Operations (M & O) Levy passed by voters in February 2017.

The proposed levy is for 2 years 2020 & 2021 (Manson has historically run 2-year levies).

The current voter approved amount scheduled to be collected this year (2019) is $1,367,278. The tax rate is $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value.

The proposed amounts are: 2020 $1,449,314 ($1.50 per $1,000) 2021 $1,536,273 ($1.50 per $1,000)

Manson’s EP & O levy funding is approximately 13% of the district’s total funding and either fully or partially supports:

  • Maintenance of school facilities, including custodial staff, equipment, supplies and utilities

  • Instructional programs/staff/technology:

    • College courses in the high school

    • Preschool for all 4 year olds

    • High school internship program

    • Support of the arts (music, drama, art)

    • Special Education (in addition to state/federal funding)

    • Vocational classes (shop, ag classes, business, technology, drones)

    • Technology support

    • Replacement of computers/devices

  • Beyond the School Day Programs

    • After school enrichment and academic intervention classes

    • Middle/High school athletics (coaches, referees, travel, uniforms, equipment)

    • Clubs (pep band, FBLA, FFA, Knowledge Bowl, robotics).

  • Food service program (fresh fruit/vegetable snacks)

  • Professional development/staff training

An informational meeting for the public will be held at Manson High School on February 4th at 6:30PM and additional informational meetings can be scheduled (687-3140). Information is also available on the district website at www.manson.org including an individual tax calculator where taxpayers can determine their estimated local school tax using their property assessed value amounts.


 

Manson School District

Replacement Capital Projects Levy

Placed on February 12, 2019 Ballot

The Manson School Board has passed a resolution placing a six-year capital projects levy on the February 12, 2019 ballot. This proposition would replace an expiring capital levy passed by voters in 2013 set to expire on December 31, 2019.

What would this capital projects levy do?

A committee of Manson community and staff members prioritized the following needs:

  1. Safety Improvements

    1. Redesigning and strengthening entrances to both schools

    2. Replacing doors, adding security cameras

    3. Replace aging fire suppression panels in each building

    4. Replace alarm/security panels

  2. Early Childhood Center

    1. Create a facility designed specifically for 3 & 4 year old children

    2. Free-up classroom space in the elementary

      1. Addresses need for small group spaces

  3. Redesign Elementary Parking/Traffic Area

    1. Expand parking for parents/visitors and staff

    2. Improve parent drop-off/pick-up location

    3. Relocate bus drop-off/pick-up location

  4. Replace Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems

    1. Majority of systems were installed in 1997-98 remodel – twenty-year life span is ending

  5. Remodel MS/HS student bathrooms

  6. Remodel MS/HS gymnasiums

    1. Replace aging wooden bleachers in MS(old) gym

  7. Replace fixtures in both buildings

    1. Plumbing, lighting and kitchen appliances

  8. Track resurfacing

    1. Proactively set aside funds to resurface when it becomes necessary

  9. Continue to invest in student technology/equipment

How much will this cost?

Fixed amount of dollars collected each year (this amount doesn’t fluctuate with assessed value changes)

$499,000 each year 2020-2025 (Previous capital levy amount was $595,000 each year (2014-2019)

Rates per $1000 of assessed property value

  • 2017 $0.72

  • 2018 $0.65

  • 2019 (current) $0.61

  • 2020 (proposed) $0.49

2019 Community Chili Feed a